hunger

Emily Wendler / StateImpact Oklahoma

For some low-income children in Oklahoma, summer does not mean vacation and playtime — It means being hungry. The lunch and breakfast these kids receive at school is no longer readily available, so they often go without — or they eat junk food. And while Oklahoma has summer food programs to combat this, there are roadblocks for many children.

The gap in access to healthy food is a potential problem for more than 400,000 Oklahoma children.

There's no way to avoid it. As the cost of college grows, research shows that so does the number of hungry and homeless students at colleges and universities across the country.

Still, many say the problem is invisible to the public.

"It's invisible even to me and I'm looking," says Wick Sloan. He came to Bunker Hill Community College in Boston more than a decade ago to teach English full time. He says it felt like he quickly became a part-time social worker, too.

The Regional Food Bank of Oklahoma is calling on everyone to wear orange this Thursday for Hunger Action Day.

KOSU's Michael Cross spoke with VP of Marketing and Communication about September as Hunger Action Month.

You can find out other ways to help on the Regional Food Bank website.

There was a time when Sandra Gologergen's freezer never ran out. Packed with traditional Inuit foods like whale, walrus, seal and fish, her freezer has been an essential lifeline, ensuring her husband, three kids and grandson make it through the long harsh winters of Savoonga, Alaska.

"Then that changed," she says.

Two Drives to Help Food Insecure

Oct 2, 2014

One out of six Oklahomans struggle with hunger every day.

KOSU's Danniel Parker reports two hunger drives are helping feed those who are struggling.

A Regional Food Bank of Oklahoma study says 650,000 people in the state don't have enough food, or know when or where they'll get their next meal.

Quinton Chandler / KOSU

Recent years of drought have led to a huge reduction in Oklahoma’s cattle population and record high prices. This year is no different.

Less rain means less grazing, a weaker wheat harvest, higher prices for grain, and on and on the costs go. But, the drought may also make it more difficult for Oklahoma farmers to lend a hand in the state’s fight against hunger.

KOSU’s Quinton Chandler reports less rain may mean fewer livestock donations to the Regional Food Bank.