horizontal drilling

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma oil executives have argued for years over a new law that would let companies drill and frack longer horizontal wells in new areas.

Right now, companies with leases in non-shale rock formations can’t drill horizontal wells more than a mile long. This one-mile limit is frustrating many of the most active drillers in Oklahoma who say companies, shareholders, mineral owners and the state’s tax coffers are missing out on millions in new development from booming oil fields. The potential is a promising political incentive, given the state’s nearly $900 million budget hole.

Headlines for Monday, April 6, 2015:

  • Bills barring local control of oil and gas drilling might have an unforeseen consequence: ending the Federal Flood Insurance program in Oklahoma. (Tulsa World)

  • The President of Oklahoma City University is joining in a critique of Oklahoma’s execution methods. (NewsOK)

  • More trouble is coming for Sampson Resources. (Journal Record)

Headlines for Wednesday, April 1, 2015:

  • Governor Fallin signs a bill to crack down on prescription drug abuse. (NewsOK)

  • Two Stillwater city counselors say they got an ultimatum by energy lobbyists to delay a vote on a drilling ban. (Tulsa World)

  • A Stillwater lawmaker says a bill dealing with earthquakes in Oklahoma protects the energy industry. (Tulsa World)

KOSU's Michael Cross talks to ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill about constitutional challenges to a horizontal drilling tax increase and a capitol repair bond as well as executions in the state of Oklahoma and the general election is just six weeks away.

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

The State Supreme Court on July 29 heard a lawsuit and constitutional challenge to House Bill 2562, a measure that would change the effective state tax rate levied on oil and gas production.

Both parties agreed that the measure was written to reduce taxes, but is HB 2562 a “revenue bill?” That definition is important because this court battle isn’t about policy, it’s about procedure.

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The rate of earthquakes in Oklahoma has increased by about 50 percent since October 2013, significantly increasing the chance for a damaging magnitude 5.5 or greater quake in central Oklahoma. 

Katsrcool / Flickr

Executives at Chesapeake Energy, Continental Resources and Devon Energy have proposed a plan for Oklahoma’s taxes on oil and natural gas production.

The proposal comes as legislators are debating state oil and gas taxes, which include an incentive for horizontal drilling that expires next year. The Oklahoman‘s Adam Wilmoth reports:

Click here to read the full .pdf explaining the poll results.

Click here to read the full .pdf explaining the poll results.