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Each month, NPR Music asks 10 public radio DJs and music directors to send in the songs they can't get enough of. The songs they select often paint a picture of their local music scene, and this month, several of them chose to highlight rising stars.

Every month, NPR Music asks public radio personalities around this country to name a new favorite song and, this month, KOSU featured Tulsa band Broncho.

Nathan Poppe

Every month, NPR Music asks public radio personalities around this country to name a new favorite song and, this month, KOSU featured Oklahoma City act Lincka.

Mark Elliott

Every month, NPR Music asks public radio personalities around this country to name a new favorite song and, this month, KOSU featured Norman band Beau Jennings and the Tigers.

Beau Jennings and the Tigers, 'Back In Town'

Every month, NPR Music asks public radio personalities around this country to name a new favorite song and, this month, KOSU featured Oklahoma City rapper Jabee.

Every month, NPR Music asks public radio personalities around this country to name a new favorite song and, this month, KOSU featured Oklahoma City natives Skating Polly.

Every month, NPR Music asks public radio personalities around this country to name a new favorite song and, this month, KOSU featured Oklahoma City band Tallows.

Tallows' aptly titled second album, Waist Deep, is full of water wordplay, with phrases like "drowning in excuses" and "wash it all clean" weaving through the lyrics. Continuing with that theme, the Oklahoma City band played its album-release show a few weeks ago in an empty swimming pool at a historic Presbyterian church. Local crowds are partial to Tallows, too, as the band's lush, frenetic sounds have been triggering rousing singalongs and dancing masses at its live shows. Pulling from influences like Modest Mouse, American Football and Pinback, Tallows' songs blur the space between math rock and electronic rock. But if you're not ready to make a decision on Tallows just yet, that's okay. Jump in halfway — the water's fine. —Ryan LaCroix, KOSU's The Spy

Emily Ulmer / courtesy of the artist

Every month, NPR Music asks public radio personalities around this country to name a new favorite song and then we feature one of those songs on Morning Edition.

Other Lives left their hometown of Stillwater, Oklahoma two years ago and relocated to Portland, Oregon to record the follow-up to 2011's Tamer Animals. In an exhaustive search for a new musical identity, the band wrote more than 60 prospective songs for their latest album, Rituals. If the lead single, "Reconfiguration," is any indication, the change of scenery did them some good. Like many of their previous efforts, "Reconfiguration" features rolling piano arrangements and lush production, but gone are the obvious folk influences and the echoey sonic imagery of wide open spaces. Moodier and smoother than its earthy predecessors, "Reconfiguration" showcases Jesse Tabish's sultry singing, which is more emotive than on past recordings. And this time around, the echo chamber is reserved for a haunting backing chorus that would give listeners the creeps if the overall arrangement weren't so damn sexy. —Jerad Walker, opbmusic

Courtesy of the artist

Every month, NPR Music asks public radio personalities around this country to name a new favorite song and then we feature one of those songs on Morning Edition.

Today we go to Oklahoma City, where Ryan LaCroix is the Operations Manager and All Things Considered host at KOSU. He also hosts a program called Oklahoma Rock Show, two hours of local music on KOSU every Thursday night.

The band Oil Boom is based in the Dallas / Ft. Worth metro area, but lead singer Ryan Taylor hails from Oklahoma City. LaCroix says the song "The Sneak Tip" is just plain fun.


Courtesy of the artist.

Every month, NPR Music asks public radio personalities around this country to name a new favorite song and, this month, KOSU & The Spy featured Beach Day.

The Florida duo Beach Day evokes images of summer with doo-wop harmonies and retro-minded riffs on Native Echoes, out August 19. In the nonchalant "Don't Call Me on the Phone," singer Kimmy Drake keeps the bad vibes at bay and the phone ringer on silent, complete with pointed messages ("Lose my number! Lose my number!"). Recorded in Detroit, the song is an excellent mash-up of garage rock and '60s girl-group sounds. Beach Day is as addictive as The Shangri-Las or Best Coast, and "Don't Call Me on the Phone" ought to have you humming along or trying to mumble the chorus by the time it's over. —Ferris O'Brien, KOSU's The Spy