Health

Each time New York state increased its tobacco tax — now at $4.35 per pack of cigarettes — calls to the state's Quitline spiked.

In New York City, then-Mayor Michael Bloomberg hiked the tax even more.

"I was so angry with him, I could hardly afford it," says Elizabeth Lane, a Harlem resident who paid $12 a pack. "I had to beg, borrow and steal to get money to buy cigarettes."

For Some Seniors Without Housing, A Parking Lot Is Home

Sep 18, 2016

Marge Giaimo makes her way to a picnic table under the shadow of an oak tree. Santa Barbara's trees, like its oceans and mountains, are one thing she says she never tires of here. After losing her senior housing three years ago, this table is where she does her painting these days.

"I feel very fortunate to have my car," Giaimo says. "It's a little cramped, but it's softer than cement."

Of all her once-valued possessions, today her 20-year-old, gold Oldsmobile is her most important one. It is her home, and she keeps it as neat as a pin.

Despite facing some of the nation's strictest anti-abortion laws, a Kansas-based foundation opened a new facility in Oklahoma City - the first new abortion provider in the state in 40 years.

The Trust Women South Wind Women's Center welcomed the first patients last week to its clinic on the city's south side. Six licensed physicians are providing services there, including abortions, OB-GYN care, family planning, adoption and emergency contraception.

Thirteen year-old Natalie Giorgi probably didn't know the name of the company that makes EpiPen. But the Sacramento, Calif., girl's death from a peanut-induced allergy attack in 2013 inspired passage of the California law that made the Mylan product a staple at every school in the state.

Clearly, researchers love Facebook, even if some of the rest of us are ambivalent.

A 2012 survey of social science papers related to the social network turned up 412 separate studies, and there have been even more since. Among the most popular questions: What effect does Facebook have on emotional states?

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Attorneys for medical marijuana supporters allege in a lawsuit that Republican Attorney General Scott Pruitt rewrote a proposed ballot question to mislead and confuse voters into thinking they were voting to fully legalize marijuana in the state.

The lawsuit was filed Tuesday with the state Supreme Court on behalf of Oklahomans for Health, a group that gathered enough signatures to have the question placed before voters.

Attorney David Slane, who filed the lawsuit, accuses Pruitt of being biased against the proposal and rewriting the question to confuse voters.

Summer is winding down, but when members of Congress return to Washington from their vacations next week, many of their constituents want them to do something about the mosquitoes — the ones carrying Zika virus, to be specific.

A new survey shows that three quarters of Americans say Congress should make the allocation of more money to deal with the Zika outbreaks in Florida and Puerto Rico an "important" or "top priority" when they return to Washington.

Oklahoma City officials are celebrating a new initiative to show calories in non alcoholic drinks.

The "Balance Calories Oklahoma" partners the Oklahoma Beverage Association and Oklahoma Grocers Association with the Oklahoma City-County Health Department.

The new labeling will be found on vending machines, self-serve fountain dispensers and retail coolers in convenience stores, restaurants and other locations.

KOSU's Michael Cross spoke with OKC Mayor Mick Cornett about his thoughts on the new program.

Doug Schwarz

A group supporting a state question to allow the medicinal use of marijuana in Oklahoma is rallying at the state Capitol.

More than 100 people chanted "let us vote" during the rally Tuesday in the building's second floor rotunda.

A petition to legalize medical marijuana in Oklahoma is unlikely to go before voters in November.

Advocates plan to challenge the attorney general's rewording of the ballot title, which is certain to push the measure beyond the election.

Attorney General Scott Pruitt says the group didn't submit its voter signatures to qualify with enough buffer time for legal challenges and for the state's Election Board to print and send ballots to counties, military members and overseas voters.

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