gun rights

Updated on Sunday at 10:00 a.m. ET

Hundreds of thousands of students, teachers, parents and victims rallied in Washington, D.C., and across the country on Saturday to demand tougher gun control measures, part of a wave of political activism among students and others impacted by school shootings.

Quinton Chandler / StateImpact Oklahoma

Gunshots ring through the chapel of First United Methodist Church. An instructional video simulating shooting rampages plays on a projector screen hanging above the pulpit between two banners that read “Good Shepherd” and “Lion of Judah.”

It’s a weeknight at the church in Newkirk. More than 150 churchgoers from communities across northern Oklahoma listen as the movie narrator reminds them the U.S. has averaged “an active shooter event with four or more deaths, every 2.9 months” since 2006.

While the U.S. continues to debate what, if any, federal firearms restrictions to enact in the wake of last month's deadly mass shooting at a Florida high school, Canada is introducing new gun laws of its own, even as opponents there have vowed to fight those changes.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's Liberal party government has proposed what it bills as "common sense gun laws," including tougher background checks and more thorough screening of people with a history of violence.

Following the mass shooting in Las Vegas last Oct. 1, which began while country star Jason Aldean was performing as the final act of the final night of the Route 91 Harvest Festival, another country singer who had played the event, Lee Brice, appeared on a local news station in South Carolina.

Lately, the NRA has relied heavily on videos to communicate with the public and its supporters, and video is how it announced its position on legislation to temporarily remove guns from people thought to pose a threat.

State legislators are moving to expand a powerful self defense law to give Oklahomans in places of worship a legal shield, if they kill in self defense.

The law known as Stand Your Ground gives people who kill or seriously wound someone in self defense immunity from prosecution — even if they didn’t try to evade the danger first.

That law could could soon cover churches, synagogues, mosques and any other “building, structure or office space … used for worship services.”

The Florida state Senate passed a package of gun control measures designed to prevent another school shooting like last month's attack on Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla.

The proposals, which passed by a 20-18 vote, include raising age restrictions on the purchase of all firearms in the state, banning the purchase and possession of bump stocks, and setting a three-day waiting period to buy any gun, including rifles and shotguns.

Colorado state law permits lawmakers to carry concealed weapons at the state Capitol because it's their place of business.

Updated at 9:43 a.m. ET

In the annals of tumultuous weeks for the still-young Trump presidency, there may not have been a more chaotic one than this, outside of his reaction to and the fallout from the summer's racist violence in Charlottesville, Va.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about Governor Fallin bringing an end to the 2018 fiscal year by signing a budget which provides $45M in cuts to agencies, the legislature looks ahead to 2019 facing a shortfall of nearly $170M and a House Committee passes three bills to expand the rights of gun owners.

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