Governor Mary Fallin

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about a budget deal at the State Capitol could lead to an early end to the 2018 legislative session, the state House passes an amended criminal justice reform bill which makes it easier for juveniles to get life without parole and Governor Fallin vetoes a measure which would have allowed people to take selfies with their ballots.

Michael Cross / KOSU

Oklahoma lawmakers are facing another shortfall for 2019, but it's not expected to be as bad as past years.

The Equalization Board approved a budget with a shortfall of $167 million for lawmakers to allocate for the next fiscal year to start on July 1st.

Meanwhile, Governor Mary Fallin says she plans to sign a 2018 budget bill which includes $45 million in cuts to state agencies, because she says it’s time to close out this year’s budget.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill about lawmakers resuming the second special session the day after starting the 2018 regular session, SoonerPoll releases results of a survey on the contenders for Governor in the primaries this June and another SoonerPoll showing unfavorable ratings for Governor Fallin and the State Legislature.

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

The State Supreme Court declares lawmakers have the constitutional right to remove an exemption to sales tax on motor vehicles.

Yesterday’s 5-4 decision on a 1.25% tax increase for car sales keeps about 100 million dollars in the budget.

KOSU's Michael Cross sat down with the Governor at the State Capitol to get her reaction to the ruling, the possibility of a special session and thoughts on Oklahoma's aid to Tropical Storm Harvey victims.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about Governor Fallin and other state officials visiting Europe to promote Oklahoma at the Paris Air Show as well as Germany and Italy and Oklahoma City inherits the American Indian Cultural Center and Museum from the state.

The trio also discuss plans to revive a bill forcing lawmakers to consider only the budget every two years and work by third parties to get candidates on the ballot in 2016.

Kate Carlton Greer / Oklahoma Tornado Project

In the wake of last year’s devastating tornadoes, millions of dollars in donations went to The United Way of Central Oklahoma. The non-profit organization also agreed to administer Governor Mary Fallin’s Oklahoma Strong tornado relief campaign. Together, the funds raised a total of $20 million. 

One week after the tornado hit the city of Moore in May of 2013, country singer Blake Shelton showed up to host a benefit concert called Healing in the Heartland.

Journal Record Legislative Report / jrlr.net

This week on 23rd and Lincoln, Marie Price talks about recent clashes between Republican Governor Mary Fallin and the GOP-led legislature.

You can find more of Marie's insights on her blog at jrlr.net.

  Governor Fallin wants to see more substantive work done in by State Representatives saying too many big problems are being ignored.

Fallin vetoed 15 House bills on Tuesday just to prove her point.

Fallin wants the State House to start focusing on what she calls substantive bills like prescription drug abuse, changing the pension system and a bond for capitol repairs.

To get the attention of Representatives she vetoed 15 bills she says are not relevant to the people of Oklahoma.

  The first day of filing for political office ended at the State Capitol Wednesday and saw more people than any opening day in at least 16 years.

419 people filed for federal, state and local positions.

At exactly 8:00, State Election Board Secretary Paul Ziriax makes the announcement.

“May I have your attention please. The 2014 candidate filing period is now open.”

The first man to file, Max Wolfley, came to the Capitol Tuesday afternoon at 4:30 to be first in line to run for the Republican ticket for House District 95.