Ervin Yen

Quinton Chandler / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma wants to go where no state has gone before: Executing death row inmates with nitrogen gas. Officials say nitrogen will bring quick, painless deaths, but the research is slim — and it has never been used in U.S. executions.

The case for nitrogen hypoxia sounds simple. Nitrogen is already in the air we breathe, but, as long as humans get the right mix, nitrogen is safe. The state wants to make death row inmates breathe pure nitrogen.

Jackie Fortier / StateImpact Oklahoma

It’s hard to get basic health care like shots and x-rays in rural Oklahoma. The federal government considers all but one of the state’s 77 counties to have a primary care shortage. The problem is driving a legislative effort to allow highly educated nurses to fill that gap — but doctors and nurse practitioners are butting heads on who is qualified to help.

Lindsi Walker sits behind a glossy wooden desk at Cordell Memorial, a hospital on Oklahoma’s western plains. She’s surrounded by pictures of her family — a stethoscope hangs around her neck.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about a two week deadline for lawmakers to come up with funding for pay raises for teachers and state workers or face a walkout by both groups and an announcement by the state Attorney General and Director of the Department of Corrections that Oklahoma will soon be using nitrogen gas to execute people on death row.

Flickr / scubabrett22

Supporters of legalizing medical marijuana in Oklahoma are opposing a Senate Bill to regulate it.

Senate Bill 1120 passed out of committee on Monday. The bill, authored by Senator Ervin Yen (R-Oklahoma City), would put tight restrictions on medical marijuana, if voters pass State Question 788 in June.

Flickr / scubabrett22

Voters will decide in June if Oklahoma will become the 30th state to legalize marijuana for medical use.

But, before voters cast their ballots on State Question 788, a bill could be pushed through the state legislature to put restrictions on medical marijuana, if it gets passed.

Storme Jones / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

Oklahomans rallied at the State Capitol Saturday as part of a nationwide effort called March 4 Trump.

State Sen. Ervin Yen, R-Oklahoma City, spoke at the event and said Trump hasn’t had a chance to begin governing yet.

“Donald Trump is my president. Let’s give him a chance. Let’s stop bashing him,” Yen said. “The administration that he has put together, I think there are some really sharp people in there. Let’s see what happens”

Oklahoma lawmakers have passed a bill that makes performing an abortion a felony.

NPR's Jennifer Ludden told our Newscast unit that the bill is the first of its kind, and an pro-abortion rights group plans to sue if the governor signs the bill into law. Gov. Mary Fallin has not yet indicated what she plans to do. Here's more from Jennifer:

Children under age 18 would be prohibited from using tanning beds under a bill approved by a Senate committee that imposes new regulations on tanning businesses in Oklahoma.

The Senate Health and Human Services Committee voted 8-1 on Monday for the bill that now heads to the full Senate for consideration.

House Bill 1471 by Rep. Justin Wood (R-Shawnee) and Sen. Ervin Yen (R-Oklahoma City) is supported by the American Cancer Society Action Network.

Dozens of parents opposed to mandatory vaccinations for their children are rallying at the Oklahoma Capitol.

About 100 people rallied Monday on the second floor of the Capitol, many of them wearing shirts that read "Oklahomans for Vaccine Choice" and "Medical Mandates are not OK."