Getting Ready for Common Core's Replacement

Oct 24, 2014

Oklahoma representatives are trying to find a replacement for the Common Core State Standards Initiative.

KOSU's Danniel Parker reports on last week's House Education Committee meeting.

House Bill 3399 made Oklahoma one of ten states not to use Common Core educational standards. A committee led by State Rep. Ann Coody is helping create a new standard for the state, set to begin in 2016.

Director of Secondary Education for Stillwater Schools Walter Howell says this raises some issues and leaves some teachers in a scramble

Oye Help Me Prepares Students For College

Oct 20, 2014

Are you an Hispanic senior in high school who will be applying to college soon?

KOSU's Diana Martinez introduces us to a group providing assistance.

Oye Help Me is hosting its 2014 Higher Education Conference on the OSU-OKC campus in the Student Center, this Saturday from 9 a.m. to noon.

Oklahoma State University Enrollment Rising

Oct 20, 2014

Enrollment at Oklahoma State University keeps rising.

KOSU's Savannah Titus reports.

Enrollment has steadily increased since 2010 and the trend continues this semester with more than 4,000 new students.

Hundreds of Colorado high school students have walked out of class in the past two weeks to protest proposed changes to the Advanced Placement history curriculum.

The firestorm of protest was sparked by a resolution in August from Jefferson County school board member Julie Williams. When she heard that conservatives across the country were upset about the new AP history curriculum, she proposed a committee to review the district's courses.

For 14-year-old Yashua Cantillano, life in New Orleans is an improvement.

But that's not saying much.

Just three months ago, Yashua was in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, dodging gang members. He says they would drive by his school, guns visible, threatening to kill him, his younger brother — Yashua's whole family.

"We'd hide all day," Yashua says, "and that kept us from going to school."

After crossing the U.S. border illegally, he came to New Orleans and ultimately enrolled at Carver Prep, a small charter school on the city's east side.

The walls are lined with robots and movie posters for Star Wars and Back to the Future. But this is no 1980s nerd den. It's the technology lab at Westside Neighborhood School in Los Angeles, and the domain of its ed-tech coordinator, Don Fitz-Roy.

"So we're gonna be talking about digital citizenship today."

More than 40 states have adopted the Common Core State Standards, new national academic benchmarks in reading and math. But the Common Core has become the center of a highly contentious debate nationwide.

Proponents say the Common Core was designed to ensure that children, no matter where they go to school, are prepared to succeed in college or the workplace upon graduation. Opponents argue that many of the standards are not age- or development-appropriate, and that they constrain the ability of teachers to adjust their teaching to their individual classrooms.

Flickr / biologycorner

Federal education officials say Oklahoma's public school standards aren't sufficiently preparing students for college or careers and will pull a waiver that lets the state bypass some provisions of the No Child Left Behind Act.

The U.S. Department of Education sent a letter to the state Thursday saying that while Oklahoma had benefited from the flexibility, it couldn't justify an extension.

The Oklahoma State Board of Education is meeting today to discuss the future of standards after the legislature repealed Common Core last May.

The board twice voted to delay the process in meetings this summer, but a vote is expected today to move the plan forward.

KOSU’s Michael Cross reports in the third part of our series on education standards in Oklahoma.

After a lengthy discussion at last month’s school board meeting, members voted five to one to table the new standards process till the next meeting.

“The Chair votes 'No'.”

Education standards in Oklahoma remain in a holding pattern with the death of Common Core by the state legislature in May.

House Bill 3399 required all schools return to Priority Academic Student Skills Standards, also known as PASS, until new standards could be developed.

But, as KOSU’s Michael Cross shows us, not all schools are choosing to throw Common Core into the dumpster.