Education

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Until recently, outside of education, no one really cared about education standards.  Few people outside of education really thought much about it before the Common Core controversy.  But where did these standards come from, and why do we have them?


Common Core, high stakes testing, A to F grading of schools, teacher shortages… it’s hard to sort out what is going on in Oklahoma schools, and we’re in the middle of an election that is likely to change the direction again.  Join us for On Tap, where we’ll discuss with teachers, administrators and the Oklahoma Department of Education what has happened and what we can expect in our kids’ classrooms next.

The event starts at 6 p.m., Wednesday, August 27 at Picasso Café located at 3009 Paseo Street, Oklahoma City, OK 73103.

Celebrities are becoming a prominent fixture in the debate over K-12 education.

This week Whoopi Goldberg used her platform on ABC's The View to speak out against teacher tenure.

Education is historically considered to be the thing that levels the playing field, capable of lifting up the less advantaged and improving their chances for success.

"Play by the rules, work hard, apply yourself and do well in school, and that will open doors for you," is how Karl Alexander, a Johns Hopkins University sociologist, puts it.

But a study published in June suggests that the things that really make the difference — between prison and college, success and failure, sometimes even life and death — are money and family.

Adrienne Keene is a post-doctoral researcher at Brown University, the author of the popular blog "Native Appropriations" and a member of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma.

A Bird's-Eye View On Common Core Across The Country

Jul 23, 2014

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

For more on the state of play nationwide for the Common Core we're joined by Cory Turner from the NPR Ed Team. Hey there, Cory.

CORY TURNER, BYLINE: Hey, Audie.

Flickr / alebonvini

KOSU is looking for college students who want to join the station as part of a program for the upcoming semester.

Students can attend any college and use the experience as internship, practicum or independent study credits.

Classes will be held once a week in Oklahoma City and Stillwater.

Students will also be producing original news content for on air and online, just like the following students.

Chloe Charlton's story on OSU ballet honoring Maria Tallchief:

The Politics Of The Common Core

Jun 20, 2014

Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal said Wednesday that he wants to cut ties with the Common Core State Standards, the benchmarks in reading and math that he helped bring to the state four years ago, and replace them with new, Louisiana-specific standards.

"We won't let the federal government take over Louisiana's education standards," Jindal said in a statement. "We're very alarmed about choice and local control over curriculum being taken away from parents and educators."

Tracey Montgomery / Restore Oklahoma Public Education

Home-schooling mom Jenni White gave some of the loudest cheers when Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin signed legislation to repeal the Common Core education standards.

White, president of Restore Oklahoma Public Education, helped organize rallies, robo calls and letters to legislators encouraging the repeal. "You name it. We had to do it," White said. "We just had to do it out of a shoestring budget out of our own accounts."

The average cost of one college year across all degree-granting intuitions in the U.S. was more than $19,000 in 2012, and we don't need to tell you what direction the price is heading. Which means lots of students are now borrowing heavily to make college work. President Obama threw some of them a lifeline earlier this week, with revisions to the government's Pay As You Earn program.

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