Education

Brett Dickerson / Red Dirt Report

The On Tap discussion for March focused on the issue of School Choice with panelists Brandon Dutcher, with the Oklahoma Council of Public Affairs, and Ryan Owens with the Cooperative Council of Oklahoma School Administrration.

Moderated by KOSU's Michael Cross, the event was cut short because of the storms.


http://okcps.belleislems.schooldesk.net/

According to a study out of UCLA, suspension rates at Oklahoma City Public Schools are some of the highest in the nation. Nearly half of the students in the district got suspended there in the 2011-2012 school year, according to this report.

The district Superintendent questions the report’s rankings, but doesn’t deny there is a discipline problem. He says they are already laying down plans to make major changes. 

Between the 7th and 8th grades Caleb Walker got suspended four times. A couple times for fighting and a couple times for being a “silly boy” according to his mom.

okhouse.gov

Funding for Education in Oklahoma has historically been low. But depending on who you ask—the dollar amount that the state spends varies widely. As do our national rankings.

One lawmaker is fed up with the confusion and is pushing a bill through the legislature to nail it down.

If you divide 4.9 billion by 631,000, what do you get?

Oklahoma’s per pupil expenditure. Or, the amount of money the state spent on each kid’s education in 2013.

In short, that’s $7,740 according to the National Center for Education Statistics.

That’s low by national standards. In fact, it puts Oklahoma at 49th out of 50 states according to the US Census Bureau.

This story was produced by The Hechinger Report, a nonprofit, independent news organization focused on inequality and innovation in education. Read more about the Common Core.

Right now, high school seniors across the country are trying hard not to think about what is — or isn't — coming in the mail.

They're anxiously awaiting acceptance letters (or the opposite) from their top-choice colleges and universities. But this story isn't about them. It's about a big group of seniors who could get into great schools but don't apply: high-achieving students from low-income families who live outside of America's big cities.

Ditching The Common Core Brings A Big Test For Indiana

Mar 12, 2015

Every eldest child knows all too well: Going first can be tough.

There's no one to help you pick the good teachers at school or give you advice on how to tell Mom and Dad about that fender bender.

Right now, Indiana is the firstborn, feeling its way through some thorny — and consequential — education decisions with little precedent to lean on.

What makes a great teacher great? That's the question at the heart of 50 Great Teachers, from the NPR Ed Team.

Sarah Hagan has a passion for math, and the pi-shaped pendant to prove it.

The 25-year-old teaches at Drumright High School in Drumright, Okla. The faded oil town is easy to miss. Fewer than 3,000 people live there, and the highway humps right around it.

This is the canary in the coal mine.

Several big states have seen alarming drops in enrollment at teacher training programs. The numbers are grim among some of the nation's largest producers of new teachers: In California, enrollment is down 53 percent over the past five years. It's down sharply in New York and Texas as well.

In North Carolina, enrollment is down nearly 20 percent in three years.

William Faulkner wrote, "The past is never dead. It's not even past." And that's never more true than when people start arguing over how American history should be taught in school.

The current fight involves the Advanced Placement U.S. history exam. Nearly half a million high school students took the test last year, hoping to earn college credit.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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