Education

Tough Week For The Common Core

Jun 9, 2014

A few months ago, when I told friends and media colleagues that I was interested in the Common Core State Standards, the most common response was "What's that?"

Now, it seems, everyone has an opinion about the Core.

And right now, opinions about the K-12 learning goals for math and English that have spread nearly nationwide are trending toward the heated.

While the school year is winding down, education policy sure isn't. This past week brought a bunch of front-page news on the Common Core.

Governor Fallin signs legislation which ends Common Core State Standards in the State of Oklahoma.

KOSU’s Michael Cross reports educators now wait for new standards from the State Department of Education.

Governor Fallin signed House Bill 3399 to repeal and replace Common Core with new standards to be developed by 2016.

Fallin told reporters at a news conference late yesterday that everyone will have an input in Oklahoma education, “Superintendents, educators, parent, public policy officials, Superintendent of Education, employers, citizens.”

Teachers Hit The Common Core Wall

Jun 3, 2014

This time next year, millions of schoolkids in the U.S. will sit down for their first Common Core test. In some places, the stakes will be high — for kids, their teachers and their communities. The goal of the Core benchmarks in reading and math is to better prepare students for college, career and the global economy. But the challenges are huge.

The Common Core Curriculum Void

Jun 3, 2014

Right now, America's schools are in a sprint. Forty-four states and the District of Columbia have adopted the Common Core State Standards. That means new learning benchmarks for the vast majority of the nation's young students — millions of kids from kindergarten through high school. And, for many of them, the Core Standards will feel tougher than what they're used to. Because they are tougher.

facebook.com/AdrianPeterson

His face swollen, breathing becoming difficult, Adrian Peterson didn't panic.

Maybe it was his resourcefulness as an elite athlete, or his ability to focus even in the most dire circumstances. But Peterson knew what to do two years ago when a severe allergy attack hit at Vikings training camp.

Now, he wants to make sure everyone else knows how to react.

Peterson has helped launch an educational program called Ready2Go for people with severe allergies.

The Common Core FAQ

May 27, 2014

The Common Core State Standards have vaulted into the national consciousness lately thanks to some high-profile dissenters, like Louis C.K. ("Kids teachers parents are vocally suffering.") and Stephen Colbert ("Common Core testing is preparing students for what they'll face as adults — pointless stress and confusion.")

Governor Fallin vetoes legislation which would have allowed parents and educators decide on whether to hold back a 3rd grader who can’t read.

KOSU’s Michael Cross reports the Governor felt it gutted her signature Reading Sufficiency Act passed a few years ago.

Governor Fallin announced the veto of House Bill 2625 on Tuesday saying a third grader not being able to read affects all Oklahomans.

“We’ll see it in our unemployment numbers. We’ll see it in our adults that are trying to hold down just a minimum wage job. We’ll see it in our prisons.”

Learning is something people, like other animals, do whenever our eyes are open. Education, though, is uniquely human, and right now it's at an unusual point of flux.

By some accounts, education is a $7 trillion global industry ripe for disruption. Others see it as almost a sacred pursuit — a means of nurturing developing minds while preserving tradition. Around the world, education means equal rights and opportunity. People risk their lives for it every day.

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

Hortense McClinton has lived with a remarkable sense of determination — for 95 years.

Her father's parents were slaves, and McClinton grew up in a completely segregated society, the all-black town of Boley, Okla.

"I didn't realize how segregated everything was," she tells NPR's Lynn Neary. That changed after a visit with her uncle in Guthrie, Okla.

DrGBB / Flickr

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Steve Green's faith led him to the U.S. Supreme Court, where he's argued the nation's new health care law and its requirement that his business provide certain types of birth control to employees violates his religious freedoms.

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