Education

The Mustang school board voted Monday (April 14) to adopt a Bible course developed by Hobby Lobby president Steve Green. The board agreed to beta-test the first year of the Museum of the Bible Curriculum, a four-year public school elective on the narrative, history and impact of the Bible.

Mike Neal gets annoyed when he talks about politicians in his state. Just three years ago, when the Common Core State Standards for education were implemented, no one had a problem with them, says Neal, president of the Tulsa, Okla., Regional Chamber of Commerce.

"It's been a really frustrating situation to the business community in Oklahoma in that we've all been on the same page, from the governor, the House, the Senate, school board members," Neal says. "They've all been behind this."

Now, things are different.

  More than 25,000 Oklahomans made their way to the Capitol on Monday to show support for Education.

The crowd included educators, parents, students and supporters from all corners of the state.

The chanting of more than 25,000 people fills the area south of the Capitol as the crowd stretches from the large steps past the dormant oil rig known as Petunia One and into the visitor parking lot.

Most of the attendees are wearing red to support education.

Dawna Watkins comes from Justus-Tiawah in Claremore.

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