Education

A teacher pay raise bill is one step closer to hitting the Governor's desk, after Lawmakers passed it out of its final Senate Committee on Wednesday.

The Senate Committee on Appropriations voted 39-3 for House Bill 1114.

The measure calls for a $1,000 teacher pay raise next year, $2,000 the following year and $3,000 in the third year. A $1,000 raise would cost about $53 million a year.

Robbinsville High School sits in a small gap in the Smoky Mountains of North Carolina. Green slopes dotted with cattle hug in around the school before they rise into a thick cover of pine trees.

David Matheson is the principal here. And he's the only high school principal in the state who still performs corporal punishment. At Robbinsville, corporal punishment takes the form of paddling - a few licks on the backside Matheson delivers with a long wooden paddle.

Tennessee caused a stir earlier this year when it ran an audit of the state's 2015 graduating class. The number crunchers in Nashville reported that nearly a third of students who received a diploma didn't complete the required coursework. One in three.

Naturally, parents and politicians alike were baffled and more than a little bothered.

New York state has passed legislation that would create the largest experiment in the country to offer free tuition at two- and four-year colleges. The Excelsior Scholarship, approved over the weekend as part of the state budget, would cover full-time students in the State University of New York system, which totals 64 campuses and 1.3 million students.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, a Democrat, appeared with Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont and state education leaders in an event hailing the new program, which would begin this fall and is estimated to cost $163 million per year.

How important is it to have a role model?

A new working paper puts some numbers to that question.

Having just one black teacher in third, fourth or fifth grade reduced low-income black boys' probability of dropping out of high school by 39 percent, the study found.

And by high school, African-American students, both boys and girls, who had one African-American teacher had much stronger expectations of going to college. Keep in mind, this effect was observed seven to ten years after the experience of having just one black teacher.

facebook.com/EdChoiceMatters

Imagine your child is not doing well in school, and you desperately want to send them somewhere else. 

You tried to transfer them to another public school but were told there’s no room.

You don't have a lot of money, can’t move, and you definitely don’t have money for private school. So now what?

Robert Ruiz, the associate director of Choice Matters, thinks this is where a school voucher could be beneficial.

OSSBA

Education funding is down more than $110 million from the beginning of last school year in Oklahoma. While legislators struggle to ensure things won't get worse, schools are already preparing for potential cuts.

A survey conducted by the Oklahoma State School Boards Association asked school districts across the state how more budget cuts would affect them next year.

Emily Wendler / KOSU

The superintendent of Oklahoma City Public Schools says the plan to close five schools in order to save money is off the table. However, cuts are going to have to come from somewhere.

State-wide financial issues are forcing the Oklahoma City Public School district to cut between $4 and $10 million dollars out of its budget.

It's a perennial debate in American education: Do kids learn best when they're sitting in rows at their desks? Or moving around, exploring on their own?

Back in the 1960s and '70s, that debate led to a brand new school design: Small classrooms were out. Wide-open spaces were in. The Open Education movement was born.

Across the U.S., schools were designed and built along these new ideas, with a new approach to the learning that would take place inside them.

For the second time this year, the State Board of Education approved a charter school application that a local school board had previously denied.

A group of parents applied to start Le Monde International School, a French and Spanish Immersion charter school in Norman, but the Norman Public School Board of Education denied their application twice.

Cathy Nashert, the President of the Norman School Board, says the application was not very strong.

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