Education

NPR Ed
4:04 pm
Mon April 13, 2015

Senators Try To Revise No Child Left Behind — A Few Years Behind

President Lyndon B. Johnson signs the ESEA in 1965 with Kate Deadrich Loney, his first schoolteacher.
Yoichi Okamoto LBJ Presidential Library

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 7:53 pm

News flash: Members of the U.S. Senate will work across party lines Tuesday for the sake of America's students.

Well, at least for a few more days.

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Student Population Growth
11:00 am
Wed April 8, 2015

Student Population Growth A Major Concern For Some Oklahoma School Districts

A class in the assistant principal's old office at Burcham Elementary in Weatherford.
Emily Wendler / KOSU

Oklahoma has gained 40,000 new students since 2008, but funding from the legislature hasn’t kept up with the growth. More students and less money means some schools are running out of space and have been dipping deep in to their savings accounts. They are making do, but it’s at a tipping point for some districts. Either they get more funding and add more space, or the class sizes get bigger and bigger.

THE NEED FOR MORE SPACE

Weatherford Public Schools in Custer County—Western Oklahoma—is bursting at the seams with kids. Normally, the district gets 20 new students a year, but lately they’ve been topping 100.

“We’ve filled up every closet, nook, and cranny in the district and we’re just at a point where we don’t have anymore space,” said Matt Holder, the Superintendent at Weatherford Public Schools.

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Education
3:23 am
Tue April 7, 2015

A New Orleans High School Adapts To Unaccompanied Minors

G.W. Carver Preparatory Academy has enrolled more than 50 unaccompanied minors from Central America. Principal Ben Davis says he's spending an extra $2,500 per student for special education services and instructional software tailored for them.
LA Johnson NPR

Originally published on Tue April 7, 2015 3:03 pm

For the past year now, many Americans have been hearing and reading about the 68,000 unaccompanied minors who have crossed illegally into the U.S. Nearly all of these minors come from El Salvador, Guatemala or Honduras, and since their arrival, immigration officials have released most of them to their parents or relatives who already live in this country.

A number of these children and teenagers are in deportation proceedings, but while they wait, they have been allowed to attend public schools. In Louisiana, schools have enrolled nearly 2,000 of them.

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Education
5:01 am
Wed April 1, 2015

The Opposite Of The Dean's List

The Education Department, headed by Secretary Arne Duncan, says it's keeping a close eye on 556 colleges and universities that do a poor job of complying with federal regulations and handling federal financial aid.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Wed April 1, 2015 5:22 pm

No school wants to be on this list.

It was just released by the Department of Education. On it are the names of 556 colleges and universities that failed the department's "financial responsibility test."

Undersecretary of Education Ted Mitchell says that each school's finances are now being placed under a microscope because the government "had serious concerns about the financial integrity of the institution or its administrative capacity."

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NPR Ed
8:03 am
Tue March 31, 2015

Live From Small Town America: Teachers Who Blog To Stay In Touch

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Tue March 31, 2015 1:53 pm

Katie Morrow became a teacher, among other things, because of wanderlust.

"I'm going to be a teacher because I can go anywhere in the world," she thought.

She's originally from a small town in Nebraska called O'Neill, population 3,700. "In the middle of nowhere, literally," she says.

So where did she end up teaching? Right back in O'Neill. She fell in love with a hometown boy and ended up at O'Neill's only public school. It's K-12, with 750 students.

Morrow teaches middle-school English; she's also a technology integration specialist.

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Education
3:46 pm
Mon March 30, 2015

Revolving Door Of Teachers Costs Schools Billions Every Year

Nearly half of all beginning teachers will leave their classrooms within five years, only to be replaced by another fresh-faced educator.
LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 4:57 pm

Every year, thousands of fresh-faced teachers are handed the keys to a new classroom, given a pat on the back and told, "Good luck!"

Over the next five years, though, nearly half of those teachers will transfer to a new school or leave the profession altogether — only to be replaced with similarly fresh-faced teachers.

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Education Rally
11:43 am
Mon March 30, 2015

Thousands Rally at State Capitol In Support of Oklahoma Public Education

Thousands gather at the State Capitol to show support for public education in Oklahoma
Emily Wendler KOSU

50,000 people were expected to be at the education rally at the capitol on Monday, but nowhere near that many came. However the teachers that were there made their presence known.

About 5,000 people showed up for the education rally at the State Capitol on Monday.

Most were teachers and school administrators who came to tell lawmakers that their shrinking budgets are making it difficult to give kids a quality education, and they need more funding.

Janet Weaver, a teacher at Hartshorne High school, says sometimes her school doesn’t have enough money for even the most basic things.

“I buy pencils for my students, I buy paper for my students… if they don’t have a pencil they can’t do my work,” she said.

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On Tap
2:12 pm
Thu March 26, 2015

March On Tap Focuses on School Choice

Credit Brett Dickerson / Red Dirt Report

The On Tap discussion for March focused on the issue of School Choice with panelists Brandon Dutcher, with the Oklahoma Council of Public Affairs, and Ryan Owens with the Cooperative Council of Oklahoma School Administrration.

Moderated by KOSU's Michael Cross, the event was cut short because of the storms.


School Suspensions
11:49 am
Wed March 25, 2015

High Suspension Rates at Oklahoma City Public Schools Trigger Systemic Changes

Belle Isle Enterprise Middle School in Oklahoma City.
http://okcps.belleislems.schooldesk.net/

According to a study out of UCLA, suspension rates at Oklahoma City Public Schools are some of the highest in the nation. Nearly half of the students in the district got suspended there in the 2011-2012 school year, according to this report.

The district Superintendent questions the report’s rankings, but doesn’t deny there is a discipline problem. He says they are already laying down plans to make major changes. 

Between the 7th and 8th grades Caleb Walker got suspended four times. A couple times for fighting and a couple times for being a “silly boy” according to his mom.

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Funding for Education
2:58 pm
Fri March 20, 2015

House Bill 1498 Seeks to Nail Down Oklahoma's Education Costs

Rep. Dennis Casey - Morrison
Credit okhouse.gov

Funding for Education in Oklahoma has historically been low. But depending on who you ask—the dollar amount that the state spends varies widely. As do our national rankings.

One lawmaker is fed up with the confusion and is pushing a bill through the legislature to nail it down.

If you divide 4.9 billion by 631,000, what do you get?

Oklahoma’s per pupil expenditure. Or, the amount of money the state spent on each kid’s education in 2013.

In short, that’s $7,740 according to the National Center for Education Statistics.

That’s low by national standards. In fact, it puts Oklahoma at 49th out of 50 states according to the US Census Bureau.

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