disposal wells

Oil and gas companies want to comply with regulators’ requests to shut down disposal wells if it blunts the boom of earthquakes, but they want the state to clarify the process used to dispute such requests, The Journal Record’s Sarah Terry-Cobo reports.

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Gov. Mary Fallin on Thursday approved the transfer of nearly $1.4 million from the state emergency fund to strengthen Oklahoma’s earthquake response.

The money is going to a pair of agencies tasked with researching the earthquake surge and regulating the oil and gas activities likely causing it.

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

SandRidge Energy has agreed to shutter some disposal wells in earthquake-prone northern Oklahoma in a settlement that avoids legal action by state oil and gas regulators.

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Scores of worried residents sounded off to state lawmakers at a pair of public meetings on Thursday and Friday about Oklahoma’s earthquake boom. Republicans and Democrats each held their own earthquake hearings. Both were rowdy.

People spoke out about home damage, insurance problems and potential injuries. They also chastised state officials for failing to rein in oil and gas activities linked to the shaking. At the Edmond meeting organized by Republican Representative Lewis Moore, people interrupted and yelled.

Fourteen Edmond residents filed a lawsuit Monday against a dozen oil and gas companies, “claiming their saltwater disposal wells were in part to blame for earthquakes that hit central Oklahoma in recent weeks,” The Oklahoman‘s Paul Monies reports.

This week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill about their expectation for 2016, new presidential action in an attempt to reduce gun violence and a dispute between the State Auditor and the Attorney General.

The trio also discuss the recent earthquakes in Oklahoma and the American Indian Cultural Center and Museum.

Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

There’s a $1 billion hole in the state budget that has consequences for Oklahoma’s environment and natural resources. A controversial state question could pit farmer against farmer. The ground beneath Oklahoma is shaking — figuratively and literally in 2016 — and StateImpact is on it.

NOT IF, BUT WHEN: PREPARING FOR THE NEXT DROUGHT

strong earthquake that woke scores of residents in the Oklahoma City area before dawn Tuesday is shaking regulators and state lawmakers.

facebook.com/GovernorMaryFallin

The annual Oklahoma Governor’s Water Conference in Norman included updates on regional water plans, drought mitigation, and experts from other states sharing their water insights. But, Governor Mary Fallin came with a new idea to save water — and reduce earthquakes.

Fallin told the crowd Oklahoma’s oil and gas industry injected 1.5 billion barrels of wastewater from fracking into the ground last year, a process scientists have linked to the state’s earthquake swarm.

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Researchers studying Oklahoma’s energy industry-linked earthquake surge and state regulators eager to quell the shaking have circled the wagons around a specific class of wells companies fill with wastewater and other fluid byproducts of oil and gas production.

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