Democrats

Oklahoma City Democratic Senator Kay Floyd has been selected as the minority leader for the next legislative session.

Sen. Floyd becomes the first woman in state history to lead a caucus in the Oklahoma State Senate when she takes the reins next year for the 57th legislature.

She says the Democrats have a large number of people running for Senate seats this year and hopes to see an increase in the minority party.

Rich Cordray steps into the Laborers Local 574 hall in central Ohio. The hall is small – a dot of blue voters in the sea of red that is rural Ohio. Cordray was expected to be the unbeatable candidate in Tuesday's Ohio Democratic gubernatorial primary.

The former head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has name recognition and Democratic street cred for once being dissed by President Trump.

Democrats are going into the 2018 elections with the wind at their backs, which could even be enough to flip a Senate map heavily stacked for Republicans come November.

Many political campaign workers spend long hours at low pay, living off of pizza and coffee, all in the hope of seeing their candidate win.

Now, labor organizers are setting their sights on bringing those workers into the labor movement at a time when the percentage of U.S. workers who belong to a union is falling steadily.

The newly formed Campaign Workers Guild claims to have helped organize at least a dozen Democratic campaigns and one political consulting firm.

The rain's coming in sheets as folks file into the Douglas Community Center in Pittsburg, Texas, population 4,707.

The organizers of an event for Democratic Senate candidate Beto O'Rourke have set out 50 chairs, but they're worried now that's going to be too many. But by the time the candidate bounces through the door, they're unfolding dozens more chairs as the crowd zooms past 100.

Updated on Feb. 6 at 12:43 p.m. ET

President Trump slammed Democrats who didn't stand and applaud during his State of the Union speech last week as "un-American" and "treasonous."

Massachusetts Rep. Joe Kennedy III, seen as a rising political star with a famous last name, will deliver the Democratic response to President Trump's State of the Union on Tuesday.

Top Democratic leaders in Congress made the announcement Thursday evening, calling Kennedy a "relentless fighter for working Americans." Kennedy is the grandson of the late Robert Kennedy, the former U.S. attorney general and New York senator who was assassinated in 1968. He is also the great nephew of both the late Massachusetts Sen. Edward Kennedy and the late president John F. Kennedy.

Ask Republicans about Democrats, or vice versa, and sooner or later you will hear: "They're out of touch with the American people."

That statement was part of the soundtrack on Capitol Hill over the first weekend of the partial government shutdown, repeated so often that one ceases to hear it.

It's an all-purpose way of condemning the hated "other" party. And it conveys the assumption that whoever is speaking is not out of touch with the American people.

On a Saturday morning in December, Kate Coyne-McCoy stood before 26 women in a small conference room in Manchester, N.H., explaining what fires her up in the morning.

"I wake up every day, the first thing I do is look at this list of members of Congress that I have, and I figure out who's sick and who's going to die," Coyne-McCoy told the women. "Because I want to replace them with you."

Updated at 1:55 p.m. ET

There are two new faces and a slimmer GOP Senate majority as the chamber returned to kick off 2018 on Wednesday.

Alabama Democrat Doug Jones takes the seat once held by Attorney General Jeff Sessions, after his December victory over controversial GOP nominee Roy Moore, who was accused by several women of sexual assault and misconduct against them when they were teens and he was in his 30s.

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