death penalty

The Two-Way
11:10 am
Tue May 13, 2014

With Just Hours To Go, Federal Court Halts Texas Execution

A Texas judge halted the planned execution of Robert Campbell, saying his lawyers could not fairly prepare an ineligibility claim because the state had not provided them with relevant information. Campbell is mentally disabled.
Texas Dept. of Criminal Justice AP

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 1:21 pm

Update at 4:57 p.m. ET. Federal Court Halts Execution:

With just hours to go, a federal court has halted the execution of Texas inmate Robert Campbell.

The execution would have been the first since Oklahoma botched one in April.

The ruling has nothing to do with the drug shortage that's dominated the narrative over the death penalty in the country. Instead, Campbell's lawyers argued that the state knew that Campbell was intellectually disabled but did not let his defense team know that.

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On Tap
2:03 pm
Mon May 12, 2014

May's On Tap Focuses on the Death Penalty

Credit Picasso's Cafe / Facebook

Join us on Wednesday, May 28 at 6pm for this month's On Tap at Picasso Cafe in Oklahoma City.

Our topic this month is the death penalty and our panelists will be Oklahoma County Asst. DA Scott Rowland and University of Oklahoma law professor Rick Tepker.

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Around the Nation
9:27 am
Fri May 9, 2014

Oklahoma Delays Next Execution For 6 Months

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 3:26 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

On a Friday, it's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

The state of Oklahoma now has at least six more months to get to know Charles Warner. He's a man who was scheduled to die, is sentenced for a brutal crime. But the state attorney general agreed to a stay of execution. That gives the state time to investigate the way it puts people to death. The investigation follows the execution of Clayton Lockett, a proceeding that took 43 minutes and intensified debate over the death penalty.

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Lethal Injection
6:01 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

The Messy Legal Road That Led To Oklahoma's Botched Execution

Republican Gov. Mary Fallin of Oklahoma, here with Michael C. Thompson, state secretary of safety and security, charged that the state Supreme Court had exceeded its jurisdiction when it called for a stay of execution in the Clayton Lockett case in March.
Alonzo Adams AP

Originally published on Thu May 8, 2014 11:08 pm

Although most of the country just became aware of issues with Oklahoma's capital punishment protocols last week after Clayton Lockett's bungled execution, his lawyers had been worried for months. That's because in January, two condemned men in different states but injected with the same new drug cocktail endured executions that went badly. Lockett's lawyer, Susanna Gattoni, was unable to keep him from suffering a similar fate last week.

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12:05 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

'Father of Lethal Injection' Talks About History, His Legacy to Oklahoma

Lead in text: 
The Tulsa World profiles Dr. Jay Chapman, Oklahoma's first chief medical examiner who invented the process of lethal injection.
The doctor who came up with the method talks about his legacy in Oklahoma and the U.S. Posted: Thursday, May 8, 2014 12:00 am | (%remaining%) Remaining Thanks for visiting the Tulsa World. You're entitled to view a limited number of free articles every 30 days.
Politics
5:15 am
Thu May 8, 2014

The Executioner's Lament

Dr. Jay Chapman, pictured here in 2007, developed the original formula for lethal injections with the intention of making executions in the U.S. more humane.
Ben Margot AP

Originally published on Fri May 9, 2014 2:47 pm

In 1977, death row inmate Gary Mark Gilmore chose to be executed by a firing squad. Gilmore was strapped to a chair at the Utah State Prison, and five officers shot him.

The media circus that ensued prompted a group of lawmakers in nearby Oklahoma to wonder if there might be a better way to handle executions. They approached Dr. Jay Chapman, the state medical examiner at the time, who proposed using three drugs, based loosely on anesthesia procedures at the time: one drug to knock out the inmates, one to relax or paralyze them, and a final drug that would stop their hearts.

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1:56 pm
Tue May 6, 2014

A Botched Execution And The Death Penalty Now

Lead in text: 
On Point interviewed Ziva Branstetter of The Tulsa World on the botched execution in Oklahoma. The program also explores the future of capital punishment in America.
A Botched Execution And The Death Penalty Now The botched execution in Oklahoma. The President calls it 'deeply troubling.' The UN says a possible violation of international law. Guests Devlin Barrett , Justice Department reporter for The Wall Street Journal. (@DevlinBarrett) Peter Neufeld , co-director of the Innocence Project.
Law
4:02 pm
Mon May 5, 2014

States Swap One Drug For Another, And Botched Executions Follow

Originally published on Mon May 5, 2014 6:35 pm

Oklahoma's botched execution of Clayton Lockett is prompting other states to question their use of the drug midazolam in lethal injections. The Lockett execution is fueling new calls to re-examine how states put inmates to death.

Law
7:38 am
Sun May 4, 2014

Should Doctors Participate In Executions?

Originally published on Sun May 4, 2014 1:06 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. The execution of a death row inmate in Oklahoma this past week has reignited the debate over the use of lethal injection in this country. According to reporters at the scene, Clayton Lockett writhed in pain after receiving the lethal combination of drugs. He had a heart attack 43 minutes later and died. On Friday, President Obama called the execution, quote, "deeply troubling" and ordered the Department of Justice to review how the death penalty is applied across the country.

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The Sunday Conversation
5:05 am
Sun May 4, 2014

A Window To Executions: How To Cover Death For A Living

Associated Press reporter Michael Graczyk stands outside Huntsville penitentiary before the execution of confessed killer Elroy Chester.
Pat Sullivan AP

Originally published on Sun May 4, 2014 1:06 pm

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

As a criminal justice reporter for The Associated Press, Michael Graczyk has covered hundreds of executions of death row inmates in the state of Texas. This means, of course, that he must be there to witness those deaths.

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