Dan Newberry

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about constitutional challenges against a state law to crackdown on drunk drivers and another to increase fees on a pack of cigarettes by a $1.50 and calls by the state's two biggest universities to ask for tuition increases in light of budget cuts from state lawmakers.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the annoucement by Tulsa Republican Senator Dan Newberry that he is resigning his seat effective next January or 2018, 17 Oklahomans sign up to run for election to two legislative seats & Governor Fallin signs the third and final bill to come out of the State Capitol to reform Oklahoma's correction system.

oksenate.gov

A Republican state Senator from Tulsa says he's resigning his seat to pursue a promotion in the private sector. But, his resignation won't be effective until January 31, 2018.

Sen. Dan Newberry is an executive at the Tulsa Teachers' Credit Union. He was first elected to office in 2008, and re-elected in 2012 and 2016.

Flickr / KOMUnews

Mid-year cuts to public schools and other state services, along with a looming budget crisis, helped draw a record number of political newcomers to races for state House and Senate offices in Oklahoma this year.

Legislators will soon learn if the same general discontent exists among voters, who head to the polls June 28 for Oklahoma's statewide primary election. Every Oklahoma senator up for re-election drew at least one opponent this year, while only 14 current House members went unopposed as a record number of candidates filed for office.

Legislation that would allow students with “deeply held religious beliefs” to use separate restrooms than their transgender peers passed through the Oklahoma Senate’s Joint Committee on Appropriations and Budget on Friday.

Under the measure, a student, parent or legal guardian would need to approach their school board and request the accommodation. No standard would have to be met to recognize the sincerely held religious belief.