DACA

Emily Wendler / StateImpact Oklahoma

When President Donald Trump ordered an end to the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program last September, he put 700,000 immigrants’ futures in jeopardy.

The Obama-era policy, also known as DACA, protects young people who were brought to America by their parents — many illegally — from deportation.

House Republican Conference

The Senate takes up debate on an immigration Monday. Rachel Martin talks to Republican Sen. James Lankford of Oklahoma who is among a group of senators introducing an immigration overhaul bill.

Updated at 6 p.m. ET

The Senate voted to begin debate on immigration Monday, launching an unusual process that could lead to a bipartisan immigration fix — or leave Congress with no solution for the hundreds of thousands of immigrants who stand to lose legal protections by March 5.

Christian Olvera's parents know how to drive. But they're afraid to, because they're in the country illegally, and they don't have driver's licenses.

So most days, Olvera drives them to work.

Olvera is 26 years old, and looks even younger, with curly black hair and a baby face. But he's taken on a lot of responsibility. On paper, Olvera owns the family business. Even the house where they live, on a leafy street in Dalton, Georgia, is in his name.

"People ask me, do you still live with your parents?," Olvera joked. "I'll say no, my parents live with me."

Two-thirds of Americans say people brought to the United States as children and now residing in the country illegally should be granted legal status — and a majority are against building a wall along the border with Mexico, according to a new NPR/Ipsos poll.

Of the 690,000 undocumented immigrants now facing an uncertain future as Congress and President Trump wrangle over the DACA program are about 8,800 school teachers.

The real possibility that they'll be deported if the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program is allowed to expire has put enormous stress on them.

cole.house.gov

NPR's Scott Simon talks with Republican Rep. Tom Cole of Oklahoma about the government shutdown that began Saturday morning.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

The U.S. government is partly shut. The stroke of midnight came but no deal from Congress to keep the government open, prompting a shutdown on the first anniversary of the inauguration of President Donald Trump. The Senate is meeting to try again to reach a deal. The House met at 9. Before he headed to the Hill, Congressman Tom Cole, Republican of Oklahoma, joined us.

Congressman, thanks so much for being with us.

cole.house.gov

NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro talks to Republican Rep. Tom Cole of Oklahoma about the GOP's legislative agenda for 2018.

TRANSCRIPT:

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

The DREAM Act has failed to pass when Democrats have held complete control of government; when Republicans have held all the cards; and in periods when the two parties have split control of the White House, Senate and House.

But lawmakers from both parties hope to secure permanent legal status for people protected by the expiring Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals , or DACA, program and they are trying to achieve some sort of solution over the next two weeks.

On the NPR Ed Team, I am what you might call the grizzled veteran. I've seen education trends come and go and come again. And go again.

You get the idea.

In years past, around December, my teammates would often pause by my desk and ask: "What do you think we'll be covering next year?"

I've always found this a fun thought exercise, and, at some point, my editor suggested I jot down my answers and share them beyond our cubicles. And so, here are a few predictions for 2018.

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