Corrections Reform

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel talk about Governor Fallin's eighth and final State of the State Address as well as a protest at the end of the speech and lawmakers begin voting on measures containing the Step Up Oklahoma plan.

Flickr / Wesley Fryer

The Oklahoma House approved legislation on Tuesday that reduces sentences for property crimes like larceny and forgery.

Republican Terry O’Donnell of Catoosa authored the bill. He says it will lower the state's overall incarceration rate and the number of women in prison — many of which are convicted for non-violent crimes like writing bad checks.

O'Donnell's office says prison admissions for property crimes grew by almost 30 percent recent years. The average sentence for those convictions has also increased over time.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill about legislative leaders wanting to move quickly on revenue and policy proposals from civic and business leaders known as Step Up Oklahoma and the 2018 regular session begins on Monday with the Governor's State of the State Address.

The trio also discusses the resignation of Oklahoma City Public School Superintendent Aurora Lora and Congressman Tom Cole vying to become the next U.S. House Appropriations Chairman.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the annoucement by Tulsa Republican Senator Dan Newberry that he is resigning his seat effective next January or 2018, 17 Oklahomans sign up to run for election to two legislative seats & Governor Fallin signs the third and final bill to come out of the State Capitol to reform Oklahoma's correction system.