Charlottesville

Emily Wendler / KOSU

Polls suggest this is one of the the most politically divided moments in American history. There are now tip sheets on how to survive Thanksgiving without disowning your family, and the comment sections of online news articles are full of vitriol.

Schools are not immune to the tension, but not everyone thinks that’s a bad thing.

Updated at 9:23 p.m. ET

A day after meeting with Sen. Tim Scott, R-S.C., to discuss improving race relations, policy issues of specific concern to communities of color and Scott's pointed criticism of President Trump after his comments in response to the violence in Charlottesville, Va., Trump is standing by those remarks.

Updated at 5:32 p.m. ET

Sen. Tim Scott, R-S.C., met with President Trump at the White House on Wednesday to discuss the president's response to last month's protests and racial violence in Charlottesville, Va., as well as specific issues facing communities of color.

For three weeks, local historians have been working to figure out who two Oklahoma City Public Schools are named after. Now, they think they’ve figured it out.

The mystery arose when Oklahoma City Public School officials announced they were thinking about changing the names of four schools thought to be named for Confederate generals. This worried local historians who said that two of those schools may actually named after former city leaders.

District leaders in the Oklahoma City Public Schools will soon head out into the community to ask this question: Should the four elementary schools they believe are the namesake of Confederate generals be renamed?

The origin of that question goes back several weeks. Right after the violence broke out in Charlottesville, Va., Charles Henry, a school board member in Oklahoma City, voiced his concern about the name of Jackson Elementary, which he says had been bothering him for a while.

After representing the organizer of a far-right rally that became a brutal melee, the ACLU says it will consider the potential for violence when evaluating potential clients — including whether protesters plan to carry guns.

Updated at 4:30 p.m. ET

A leading Republican senator told reporters on Thursday that President Trump "has not yet been able to demonstrate the stability, nor some of the competence that he needs to demonstrate in order to be successful."

Tennessee Sen. Bob Corker was at the Rotary Club of Chattanooga and spoke to local reporters there. In video posted by Chloe Morrison of Nooga.com, Corker added, "And we need for him to be successful. Our nation needs for him to be successful."

Vice News Tonight correspondent Elle Reeve (@elspethreevespent last weekend embedded with the organizers of the “Unite the Right” rally. The 22-minute documentary she aired takes viewers inside the movement, and features the voices of the event’s leaders, including white supremacist Christopher Cantwell.

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KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Emily Wendler / StateImpact Oklahoma

Recent violent events in Charlottesville have spurred Oklahoma City Public School board members to consider the significance of school names like Lee, Jackson, Stand Watie, and Wheeler.

The four schools are named after Confederate Civil War officers, and board members have expressed interest in changing the school names.

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