The World

Weekdays from 2-3 p.m.
  • Hosted by Marco Werman

Each weekday, host Marco Werman and his team of producers bring you the world's most interesting stories in an hour of radio that reminds us just how small our planet really is. The World is heard on over 300 stations across North America.

Ways to Connect

R
Reuters/Arnd Wiegmann

Lone wolf terrorism.

Unpredictable, untraceable and undefinable. A mindboggling problem for security officials.

These kinds of attacks have been plaguing the United States, France — and now Germany.

R
Rodi Said/Reuters 

The Islamic State group is losing ground, and its leaders know it. 

Abu Mohammad al-Adnani, the official spokesman for ISIS, has come pretty close to acknowledging that the territory controlled by the group is slipping away. 

In a statement released in May, Adnani warned the enemies of ISIS, “O America! Listen, O Crusaders! Listen, O Jews!”

“You will never be victorious. You will be defeated,” he said. “Do you, O America, consider defeat to be the loss of a city or the loss of land?” 

B
Courtesy of Blair Imani

On April 13, 2016, barely a month after I started observing hijab, I attended an event called "Conversations with Bill." It was a fundraiser for Hillary Clinton, one of the first I had attended, and I was so excited to hear from the former president.

R
Mike Segar/Reuters

In Bill Clinton's primetime valentine to the 2016 Democratic candidate for president, he said this of Hillary Clinton:

"You could drop her into any trouble spot, pick one, come back in a month and somehow, some way, she will have made it better. That is just who she is."

Really? How about Syria?

Joshua Landis, director of Middle East studies at the University of Oklahoma, has studied Syria for years and lived there before the civil war.

R
Carlo Allegri/Reuters

GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump issued a challenge to Russia at a Miami press conference on Wednesday.

“Russia, if you’re listening, I hope you’re able to find the 30,000 emails that are missing. I think you’ll probably be rewarded mightily by our press.”

It is not clear what set of emails Trump is referring to.

I
Leo Hornak/The World

When loyal supporters of unsuccessful Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders say they will not vote for Hillary Clinton, it's usually for one of two reasons: Either they believe in Sanders' political revolution and want to use their vote as a statement, or they do not fear the possibility of a President Donald Trump.

Some voters with relatives who are undocumented say they can't afford to make either of those choices, no matter how much they're feeling the Bern.

The amphitheater is humming: teachers hover, students murmur over spelling sheets and proud parents deliver the last gasps of pep talks. After final embraces and a tear or two, the spelling competitors are swept backstage.

It is sixth grader Jybr Reynoso Hidrogos’ second time competing. He made the top five last year, but fell short of a trophy. Every day since, he’s spent two hours or more practicing spelling. That’s what helped him beat out his classmates and win a preliminary contest to wind up here today.

R
Saul Loeb/Reuters

Hillary Clinton is the first woman to be nominated by a major party for the US presidency.

If elected in November, Clinton would join German Chancellor Angela Merkel and British Prime Minister Theresa May at the helm of some of the world's largest economies.

Would that mark a turning point for women wielding power around the world?

Newcastle's biggest university says no to more coal

Jul 26, 2016
N
Public Domain

A city built on coal wealth is turning away from the fossil fuel. Or at least, its biggest university is.

Newcastle University has become the most recent UK university pledging to divest from fossil fuels. The university joins a growing number of UK schools that have moved toward investments in alternative energy solutions.

Newcastle’s decision comes on the heels of similar announcements last year by 10 other UK schools.

R
U.S. First lady Michelle Obama addresses the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, PennsylvaScott Audette/Reutersnia, U.S. July 25, 2016. REUTERS/Scott Audette

Nigerians seem to be parsing each twist and turn of the US presidential race. 

And Chude Jideonwo, a Lagos-based media entrepreneur and lawyer, says his Nigerian friends on Twitter are trading thoughts today on just one topic. 

"Everyone is unanimous, it's Michelle Obama for POTUS," Jideonwo says, adding that his Twitter feed was stocked with videos, photos and tweets from the first lady's speech at the DNC Monday night. "She was undoubtedly the standout." 

Pages