The World

Weekdays from 2-3 p.m.
  • Hosted by Marco Werman

Each weekday, host Marco Werman and his team of producers bring you the world's most interesting stories in an hour of radio that reminds us just how small our planet really is. The World is heard on over 300 stations across North America.

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The great catfish war rages on

48 minutes ago

Townsend Kyser is a third-generation catfish farmer in the city of Greensboro — population 2,365 — the catfish capital of Alabama.

“I don’t know how it got the designation, but we’re proud to have a catfish industry in Greensboro, as well as in this area of Alabama,” says Kyser. “It’s one of the biggest economic drivers in our area and it creates a lot of jobs in what would be considered a pretty poor area in the state.”

President Donald Trump’s nominee for secretary of state took a big step closer to confirmation on Monday night. In a surprise vote, a key Senate committee approved the nomination of CIA director Mike Pompeo for the job. Pompeo is expected to face a vote in the full Senate later this week. One lawmaker who voted "no" is Robert Menendez of New Jersey, the top Democrat on the Foreign Relations Committee.

Menendez spoke with The World’s Marco Werman and the following is a transcript of the full interview.

When the US Supreme Court hears oral arguments Wednesday in a legal challenge to President Donald Trump’s travel ban, the justices may think back to an infamous decision from 1944.

I’m thinking about getting a hurricane tattooed on my left shoulder.  

Unintentionally, all my tattoos are a reminder of something: Something that I want to forget, something that I tend to forget, something that I can’t forget. My tattoo would be white, grey and turquoise. The eye of the hurricane in the center of my shoulder, three-dimensional, so if you look right into it you would feel as if my skin could suck you in. 

Every day, nearly half a million workers stream into the white stone banks and office buildings in the City of London, a single square mile at the historic core of greater London.

It’s the financial capital of Europe, but it’s not all business.

Hidden behind courtyard walls and through narrow passageways are roughly 200 open spaces designed to provide the workers of the city some respite from its hustle and bustle.

The French may soon have to accept 'le doggy bag'

Apr 23, 2018

At a sunny cafe terrace in the Paris neighborhood of Aligre, I am trying to finish a giant croque-monsieur — a typical French ham and grilled cheese sandwich   but it’s just atypically too big. So I get up to ask the manager if I can have a doggy bag for my leftovers.

“Un doggy bag?” he says. “No we don’t have any containers.”

I moved to Minneapolis for Prince

Apr 22, 2018

I moved to Minneapolis, sight unseen and without a friend in the city, in the fall of 2012. When people asked me why, the running joke was: "For Prince."

Except, it wasn't a joke.

This artist wants to make you smile

Apr 20, 2018

Bren Bataclan is an artist whose goal is to make you smile. Read on to learn exactly how he does that, but here's some background first.

Bataclan was born in the Philippines and moved to the United States with his family in 1981. He was 12 years old when they arrived, and together they all settled in Daly City. That's a section of San Francisco with a large Filipino population. The excitement of their arrival is depicted in Bataclan's painting "Daly City, Our New Home."

The town of Santa María del Mar, Mexico, hasn’t had electricity for more than three years. At night a generator hums in the town plaza, powering a few pale streetlights. 

Santa María, population 800, rests at the end of a skinny peninsula sandwiched between the Pacific Ocean and a shallow lagoon that locals call the Dead Sea. Most days tempestuous winds drawn off the hot plains of Mexico’s Oaxaca state billow across the peninsula out toward the cool Pacific. 

Castro steps down as Díaz-Canel assumes Cuban presidency

Apr 19, 2018

A page of history turned yesterday as Raul Castro, Cuban president and brother of revolutionary leader Fidel Castro, stepped down from office to make way for a new generation of leadership and an uncertain future for the embattled archipelago.

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