StoryCorps Oklahoma

Wednesdays during Morning Edition & All Things Considered

Founded in 2003 by Dave Isay, StoryCorps has given more than 450,000 people — Americans of all backgrounds and beliefs, in towns and cities in all 50 states — the chance to record interviews about their lives.

The organization preserves the recordings in its archive at the Library of Congress, the largest single collection of human voices ever gathered, and shares select stories with the public through StoryCorps' weekly podcast, NPR broadcasts, animated shorts, digital platforms, and best-selling books.

These powerful human stories reflect the vast range of American experiences, wisdom and values; engender empathy and connection; and remind us how much more we have in common than divides us.

Locally recorded stories will air Wednesdays during Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

KOSU thanks Phillips Murrah, Oklahoma’s business law firm, for sponsoring the StoryCorps mobile recording booth in Oklahoma City this February and March. Phillips Murrah: the Power of a Strategic Partner. More information at phillipsmurrah.com.

Growing up, half sisters Glennette Rozelle and Jennifer Mack were used to hearing their parents fight.

At StoryCorps, the women remember the night that changed everything for their family.

It was Valentine's Day, 1977. Minnie Wallace and Virgil "Glenn" Wallace were raising four children outside Oklahoma City. Glennette, then 7, and 10-year-old Jennifer, who was Glenn's stepdaughter, were home on a night that took them decades to process.

The StoryCorps mobile booth was in Oklahoma City in early 2018, and we're bringing you some of the stories that were recorded here. Locally recorded stories will air Wednesdays during Morning Edition and All Things Considered on KOSU.

The StoryCorps mobile booth was in Oklahoma City in early 2018, and we're bringing you some of the stories that were recorded here. Locally recorded stories will air Wednesdays during Morning Edition and All Things Considered on KOSU.

The StoryCorps mobile booth was in Oklahoma City in early 2018, and we're bringing you some of the stories that were recorded here. Locally recorded stories will air Wednesdays during Morning Edition and All Things Considered on KOSU.

The StoryCorps mobile booth was in Oklahoma City in early 2018, and we're bringing you some of the stories that were recorded here. Locally recorded stories will air Wednesdays during Morning Edition and All Things Considered on KOSU.

In this week’s StoryCorps episode, Cynthia Calloway and her husband Roosevelt. They grew up on the opposite sides of Florida and had very different childhood experiences as young African American kids in the 1960s. They came to the StoryCorps mobile booth in Oklahoma City to talk about how those experiences shaped their outlooks on life.

The StoryCorps mobile booth was in Oklahoma City in early 2018, and we're bringing you some of the stories that were recorded here. Locally recorded stories will air Wednesdays during Morning Edition and All Things Considered on KOSU.

The StoryCorps mobile booth was in Oklahoma City in early 2018, and we're bringing you some of the stories that were recorded here. Locally recorded stories will air Wednesdays during Morning Edition and All Things Considered on KOSU.

It’s been five years since a second deadly EF-5 tornado struck Moore, Oklahoma. Vicki Hudoba lost her home in that tornado. She and her daughter Nicole Moore came to the Oklahoma City StoryCorps mobile booth to talk about that day in 2013 and how holding her infant grandson Luke held them together in the midst of devastation.

The StoryCorps mobile booth was in Oklahoma City in early 2018, and we're bringing you some of the stories that were recorded here. Locally recorded stories will air Wednesdays during Morning Edition and All Things Considered on KOSU.

The StoryCorps mobile booth was in Oklahoma City in early 2018, and we're bringing you some of the stories that were recorded here. Locally recorded stories will air Wednesdays during Morning Edition and All Things Considered on KOSU.

Eighty-six-year-old George Hill's family mastered frontier survival skills. When his father was born prematurely in 1889, his grandmother made an incubator out of their wood stove. So, when George was born in the Texas panhandle in the middle of the depression, his family was ready to tap those ingenious survival skills and start again.

The StoryCorps mobile booth was in Oklahoma City in early 2018, and we're bringing you some of the stories that were recorded here. Locally recorded stories will air Wednesdays during Morning Edition and All Things Considered on KOSU.

When refugees arrive in the United States, they spend many of the early years trying to understand the culture, find a job and build a life. But what happens a generation later? How do they pass on the legacy of survival and grit to their children?

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