Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

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The Two-Way
8:53 am
Thu September 18, 2014

Senate To Vote On Arming Rebels As Islamic State Seizes Villages

Islamic State fighters backed by tanks have seized 16 Kurdish villages in the past 24 hours in what is being described as a major advance for the extremist group in northern Syria, according to a human rights watchdog group.

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The Two-Way
7:41 am
Thu September 18, 2014

Scotland's Historic Decision: Should It Stay Or Should It Go?

A man plays the bagpipes on a "short walk to freedom" march in Edinburgh, Scotland on Thursday as polling in the independence referendum began.
Paul Hackett Reuters/Landov

Scots decide today whether to end 300 years of union with Great Britain and go it alone as they cast ballots in a historic referendum that is sure to have a lasting impact no matter which way it goes.

Public opinion polls in recent days have suggested that Scotland is very evenly split on the question and that the vote could be extremely close. The options are to vote "yes" or "no" to the question: "Should Scotland be an independent country?"

The results are expected on Friday.

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The Two-Way
1:50 pm
Wed September 17, 2014

Iran's Foreign Minister: U.S. 'Not Serious' About Defeating Islamic State

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif speaks during a recent news conference in Rome. Zarif told NPR that the U.S. has been hesitant and contradictory in its approach to dealing with the self-declared Islamic State.
Fabio Campana EPA/Landov

Originally published on Thu September 18, 2014 5:34 am

Iran's foreign minister says the U.S. has been hesitant and contradictory in its approach to combating extremist groups in Iraq and Syria and that President Obama needs a reality check on the subject of defeating the Islamic State insurgency.

Mohammad Javad Zarif, speaking with Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep in an interview to air on NPR, said the United States is "not serious" about defeating the Sunni extremists.

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The Two-Way
10:00 am
Wed September 17, 2014

Wildfire Threatens More Than 1,500 Homes In Northern California

A photo from Sunday shows a wildfire as it approaches the shore of Bass Lake, Calif. Several blazes are being fueled by record drought conditions.
Darvin Atkeson AP

Originally published on Wed September 17, 2014 1:42 pm

Updated at noon ET.

The largest of several wildfires in California, the so-called King Fire in the Sierra Nevada forest east of Sacramento, is threatening 1,600 homes as it continues to spread almost unchecked.

According to the latest information, the King Fire, one of several that California firefighters are battling, has engulfed more than 18,500 acres and is only 5 percent contained.

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The Two-Way
8:32 am
Wed September 17, 2014

Police Hunt For Armed 'Survivalist' In Pa. Trooper Shooting

This undated photo of Eric Frein was released Tuesday by Pennsylvania State Police. Frein, 31, is being sought in connection with last week's killing of a state trooper and the critical wounding of another.
AP

Originally published on Wed September 17, 2014 12:54 pm

Authorities have identified a suspect in last week's shooting death of a state trooper and the wounding of another officer at a police barracks in northeastern Pennsylvania, warning the public to be on the lookout for a heavily armed man described as a "survivalist."

Police have launched a manhunt for the suspect, Eric Frein, 31, of Canadensis, Pa.

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The Two-Way
8:00 am
Wed September 17, 2014

House Poised To Vote On Arming, Training Syrian Rebels

House Speaker John Boehner has expressed cautious support for the White House plan. He and other House GOP leaders are backing a measure to authorize the arming and training of moderate Syrian rebels.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Wed September 17, 2014 12:28 pm

Updated at 11:30 a.m. ET

President Obama will meet today with military officials at U.S. Central Command in Tampa, Fla., to discuss the fight against the militants calling themselves the Islamic State, as House lawmakers prepare for a vote to authorize training for moderate rebels to oppose the extremist group.

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The Two-Way
11:57 am
Tue September 16, 2014

Dempsey Says If Needed He Would Recommend Ground Forces In Iraq

Members of the anti-war activist group CodePink interrupt a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing with Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel (left) and Gen. Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 2:57 pm

Gen. Martin Dempsey, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, told lawmakers today that while the president has ruled out "boots on the ground" as part of a campaign to destroy the Islamic State insurgency in Iraq, he was prepared to recommend a combat role for U.S. advisers or ground troops if the situation warrants.

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The Two-Way
8:40 am
Tue September 16, 2014

Ukraine Approves EU Pact And Temporary Self-Rule For Rebels

Ukrainian lawmakers applaud a televised address by the President of the European Parliament Martin Schulz (on screen) in the Ukrainian parliament on Tuesday in Kiev. The parliament voted to strengthen trade ties with the EU, but not until 2016.
Sergey Dolzhenko EPA/Landov

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 5:23 pm

Ukraine's parliament has granted separatist-held areas temporary self-rule and given militants amnesty in a vote aimed at quelling a months-long insurgency that has threatened to permanently cleave.

The parliamentary move comes in tandem with another to expand economic ties with the European Union beginning in 2016. Last year, former President Viktor Yanukovych rejected a similar pact, leading to his ouster in November.

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The Two-Way
8:34 am
Tue September 16, 2014

U.S. Begins Airstrikes In Support Of Iraqi Ground Forces

Members of Iraqi security forces are seen during a fight with Islamic State militants Sunday on the outskirts of the city of Ramadi.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 4:01 pm

The United States has begun its first-ever airstrikes in direct support of Iraqi ground forces, in the opening move of what could be a protracted fight against so-called Islamic State militants in the region.

NPR's Tom Bowman, on Morning Edition, says the airstrikes, south of Baghdad, targeted an Islamic State position after Iraqi soldiers fighting them requested the assistance.

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The Two-Way
6:47 am
Tue September 16, 2014

Suicide Bombing In Kabul Kills 3 NATO Troops

A U.S. soldier stands guard near a damaged vehicle at the site of a suicide attack in Kabul on Tuesday.
Mohammad Ismail Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 4:07 pm

The Taliban has claimed credit for a suicide attack on a military convoy just yards from the U.S. Embassy in Kabul that killed at least three NATO soldiers and wounded nearly 20 other troops and civilians.

NPR's Sean Carberry, reporting from the Afghan capital, says the car bomb was detonated on one of the busiest streets in the city during rush hour.

"It shook the capital and set off alarms at the embassy," he says.

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