Quinton Chandler

StateImpact Oklahoma

Quinton Chandler joined StateImpact Oklahoma in January 2018, focusing on criminal justice reporting.

He is a graduate of Oklahoma State University with degrees in Economics and Marketing. Chandler was a student reporter at KOSU, and later a host and reporter at KBBI Radio in Homer, Alaska and education reporter at KTOO Public Media in Juneau, Alaska.

Quinton loves writing, reading and has an intense relationship with his Netflix account.

Ways to Connect

In 1889 the town of Ingalls was settled in the unassigned lands almost overnight after settlers staked their claims in the Oklahoma Land Run. With some farming and a few oil strikes, Ingalls had a chance to thrive, but instead it suffered the same fate as dozens of other Oklahoma towns. The fate of a ghost town.

After failing results and a lawsuit, DHS is taking a different approach to shore up its foster care system. The agency is outsourcing. Contracting foster parent recruitment and management out to private agencies that have more free time and available resources. KOSU’s Quinton Chandler reports how the change is expected to help and the reaction from a couple of Oklahoma City’s foster parents.

Flickr: futureatlas.com

What do you pump pure gas or do you use a little ethanol? In most of the country there’s no question you go with the mix but there are a lot of holdouts in Oklahoma who still demand a regular supply of ethanol free fuel. Why? What does pure gas do that the ethanol can’t? KOSU’s Quinton Chandler finds the answers and explains how federal standards may take away our choice between the two types of gas.

Quinton Chandler

Yesterday Quinton Chandler took you to the front lines of Woodward Oklahoma’s housing market. And we heard from Woodward’s residents how floods of oil boomers are building new RV Parks and tying local hotels up for weeks at a time. Today, we look at the upside to Woodward’s new growth. And we’ll see what is being done to meet the challenge of housing so many people.


Quinton Chandler

Before Oklahoma was a state dozens of makeshift towns sprung from its red dirt to make room for hungry settlers drawn by a fantastic oil boom and promises of a new start. Today Black gold is proving to have the same seductive power, but in this case oil isn’t the only commodity people will pull up stakes for. Crowds are pouring into a town in Northwest Oklahoma, looking for jobs created by the oil, natural gas, and wind industries. But just like 100 years ago there may not be enough room for all of them…

Woodward, Oklahoma has a cycle. Monday through Thursday its busting at the seams and over the weekend the town deflates like a tire losing air. It’s Friday and people are on the way out. Lines of cars and trucks pile up at every stoplight. One of the local gas stations can have a car at every pump any time of day. And anywhere you go there’s trucks from Chesapeake energy, so and so’s pipeline, and such and such drilling.

Flickr: comedynose

The Affordable Care Act takes another stab at fixing healthcare for all Americans.  But, one change buried deep in the hundreds of pages of sections and subtitles could make a big difference for one specific group of Oklahomans.

“I’m David Touhty, I’m the Chief Development officer with the Oklahoma City Indian Clinic. The Indian Health Care Improvement Act is going to help us expand and really bring health care into the 21st century."

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