Quinton Chandler

StateImpact Oklahoma

Quinton Chandler joined StateImpact Oklahoma in January 2018, focusing on criminal justice reporting.

He is a graduate of Oklahoma State University with degrees in Economics and Marketing. Chandler was a student reporter at KOSU, and later a host and reporter at KBBI Radio in Homer, Alaska and education reporter at KTOO Public Media in Juneau, Alaska.

Quinton loves writing, reading and has an intense relationship with his Netflix account.

Ways to Connect

Quinton Chandler / StateImpact Oklahoma

More than 30 people sit uncomfortably on hard, wooden benches under the watchful eyes of Judge Tim Henderson. It’s late morning in Henderson’s courtroom at the Oklahoma County courthouse. Some people have been waiting for hours.

Most of these people are on probation, and they’re anxiously waiting for their chance to make a deal. Judge Henderson says these people broke their plea agreements.

COMING TO TERMS

Kate Carlton Greer / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

The Oklahoma Department of Corrections has stopped hiring for the rest of the budget year to prepare for potential funding cuts.

Corrections Director Joe Allbaugh decided to freeze hiring after the state Legislature voted down a series of tax increases known as the Step Up Oklahoma plan, Monday.

Flickr / Wesley Fryer

The Oklahoma House approved legislation on Tuesday that reduces sentences for property crimes like larceny and forgery.

Republican Terry O’Donnell of Catoosa authored the bill. He says it will lower the state's overall incarceration rate and the number of women in prison — many of which are convicted for non-violent crimes like writing bad checks.

O'Donnell's office says prison admissions for property crimes grew by almost 30 percent recent years. The average sentence for those convictions has also increased over time.

Quinton Chandler / StateImpact Oklahoma

Twenty years is a long time to live with a drug addiction, but Rachel Wachel has done it. She tends bar, has a house and a car — and calls herself a functioning addict.

“I’m very open and honest about it because what do you do besides try to work with it the best way you can,” she says, exiting an an Oklahoma County courtroom.

Wachel’s lawyer is working to get her a suspended sentence for a misdemeanor drug possession charge. She’s addicted to opiate painkillers and says she takes half a pill three times a day.

StateImpact Oklahoma, a collaboration of NPR member stations in Oklahoma, has added two new reporters to their team.

facebook.com/StJohnHealthSystem

La Fortune Cancer Center inside Tulsa's St. John Medical Center announced a budding partnership Tuesday with MD Anderson one of the foremost cancer treatment centers in the world. KOSU’s Quinton Chandler reports  the alliance may bring new hope to patients.

Quinton Chandler / KOSU

Recent years of drought have led to a huge reduction in Oklahoma’s cattle population and record high prices. This year is no different.

Less rain means less grazing, a weaker wheat harvest, higher prices for grain, and on and on the costs go. But, the drought may also make it more difficult for Oklahoma farmers to lend a hand in the state’s fight against hunger.

KOSU’s Quinton Chandler reports less rain may mean fewer livestock donations to the Regional Food Bank.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/electricnerve/497858332
Mark Roy, a.k.a. electricnerve / Flickr

A surprising decision from the Oklahoma City Council will allow an upscale gun range to serve alcohol once it finishes renovations. KOSU’s Quinton Chandler reports two council member’s opinions.

Below, read Wilshire Gun Range's alcohol policy:

Quinton Chandler

For the final part of our ghost town series we resurrect the history behind not one but dozens of settlements spread throughout the state. The all black towns of Oklahoma. KOSU’s Quinton Chandler reports most of these towns were small unorganized rural communities that  are almost all dead and gone. But there are a few left to give us a hazy picture of the past.

Quinton Chandler / KOSU

Food trucks have been growing in popularity across America, and recently they’ve come to Stillwater.  But the truck owners have been forced to wait for the college town to catch up and adapt to the food truck market. KOSU’s Quinton Chandler has the story.

Sometimes local governments get to set regulations in anticipation of new businesses, but sometimes an industry pops up and gets big enough to force regulations to catch up.

Pages