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Author Interviews
6:21 pm
Sun June 7, 2015

In Debut Novel, Air Force Officer Questions How We Honor Our Veterans

Lydia Thompson NPR

Why do we honor combat veterans? In his new novel, Air Force officer Jesse Goolsby asks that question through the stories of three veterans, their experiences in war and their lives back at home.

I'd Walk with My Friends If I Could Find Them is grounded in the wars of the last 15 years, but Goolsby points out the action takes place as much in the private lives the men lead in America as it does on the battlefield.

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All Tech Considered
6:21 pm
Sun June 7, 2015

What Makes Algorithms Go Awry?

By clicking "Like" and commenting on Facebook posts, users signal the social network's algorithm that they care about something. That in turn helps influence what they see later. Algorithms like that happen all over the web — and the programs can reflect human biases.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed June 10, 2015 2:23 pm

Like it or not, much of what we encounter online is mediated by computer-run algorithms — complex formulas that help determine our Facebook feeds, Netflix recommendations, Spotify playlists or Google ads.

But algorithms, like humans, can make mistakes. Last month, users found the photo-sharing site Flickr's new image-recognition technology was labeling dark-skinned people as "apes" and auto-tagging photos of Nazi concentration camps as "jungle gym" and "sport."

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Music
4:47 am
Sun June 7, 2015

Kate Tempest: 'When You're Writing, It's Not About You'

"When I was writing or performing, it felt like a storm was breaking, like something very elemental and forceful was happening," Kate Tempest says, explaining her chosen stage name.
India Cranks Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon June 8, 2015 10:00 am

Kate Tempest is a woman of words. The English rapper, poet, playwright and novelist keeps language — and the stories that language brings to life — at the core of everything she does. Her subjects are everyday people: their hardships and failures, their loves and losses.

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Jazz
5:18 pm
Sat June 6, 2015

The Beat-Man Behind 'Birdman'

Antonio Sanchez is well known to jazz fans, but the drummer and bandleader got a boost when director Alejandro González Iñárritu chose him to compose a percussion-only score for the film Birdman.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat June 6, 2015 6:40 pm

Antonio Sanchez is one of the most accomplished and in-demand drummers around, and right now he's experiencing a breakthrough. Jazz heads have known him for years, but he reached a much wider audience last year with his score for the film Birdman.

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Author Interviews
5:18 pm
Sat June 6, 2015

'Balm' Looks At Civil War After The Battles, Outside The South

Courtesy of Amistad

Originally published on Mon June 8, 2015 1:22 pm

Dolen Perkins-Valdez wants to change readers' perspective on the Civil War. Her best-selling debut novel, Wench, explored the lives of slave women — not on Southern plantations, but in a resort for slaveowners' mistresses in Ohio. Her new book, Balm, is set in the postwar period, and it's also in an unexpected place: Chicago.

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Deceptive Cadence
7:48 am
Sat June 6, 2015

For Benedictine Monks, The Joy Of Making Albums And Beer

The monks of Norcia, Italy have recorded their first album, Benedicta.
Christopher McLallan Decca

Originally published on Sat June 6, 2015 12:44 pm

"The monastic life is very plain and ordinary," says Father Cassian Folsom, the founder and prior of the Monks of Norcia, ensconced in the St. Benedict Monastery in central Italy. "You get up, and you pray, and you do your work and go to bed and then the next day you do the same thing."

A large portion of the monks' daily routine is singing. "We chant the Divine Office and the Mass every day," Folsom tells NPR's Scott Simon. "And if you put all of those moments together it takes about five hours a day. Three hundred sixty-five days a year."

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Code Switch
3:44 am
Fri June 5, 2015

Former Baltimore Mayor: City Must Confront The 'Rot Beneath The Glitter'

Kurt Schmoke, former mayor of Baltimore, is now the president of the University of Baltimore.
Courtesy of the University of Baltimore

Originally published on Fri June 5, 2015 7:58 am

It's the end of a tough week in Baltimore. Tensions continue in the Freddie Gray case. And now the murder rate has spiked to a 40-year high. One man who understands well what the city is going through is Kurt Schmoke. He's a native son and was elected as Baltimore's first black mayor in 1987. He served three terms, grappling with high unemployment, poor schools and violent crime.

Now the president of the University of Baltimore, Schmoke shares his memories of the city and his thoughts about moving it forward with Morning Edition.

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Music Interviews
5:31 pm
Thu June 4, 2015

Telling Brian Wilson's Fractured Life Story On Film

Paul Dano (center) co-stars in Love & Mercy as Brian Wilson in the 1960s heyday of The Beach Boys.
Francois Duhamel Roadside Attractions

Originally published on Thu June 4, 2015 8:50 pm

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Music Interviews
6:43 pm
Wed June 3, 2015

Mumford & Sons On Plugging In And Turning Up

Mumford & Sons' electrified new album is called Wilder Mind.
Ty Johnson Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu June 4, 2015 7:07 pm

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National Security
5:30 pm
Wed June 3, 2015

Gen. Martin Dempsey On Iraq: A Fight That Will Take 'Multiple Years'

Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Martin Dempsey speaks during the graduation ceremony at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, N.Y., on May 23. In an interview with NPR, he says he's not surprised by the slow going against the Islamic State, predicting it will be a "long campaign."
Mike Groll AP

Originally published on Thu June 4, 2015 12:42 am

Gen. Martin Dempsey has spent more than a decade dealing with Iraq, and as his tenure as chairman of the Joint Chiefs winds down, he sees a conflict that will long outlast his time in uniform.

Dempsey helped train the Iraqi military from 2005 to 2007 in what he describes as a "debacle" in the early stages. He saw the rapid rise of the self-described Islamic State, also known as ISIS or ISIL. And now he oversees the U.S.-led bombing campaign against the extremist group in both Iraq and Syria.

And he has no illusions it will be quick or easy.

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