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Music Interviews
5:31 pm
Sat June 20, 2015

'Lester, You Changed Our Lives': Channeling Bangs In 'How To Be a Rock Critic'

Erik Jensen portrays rock critic Lester Bangs in the new one-man play How to Be a Rock Critic.
Craig Schwartz

Originally published on Sat June 20, 2015 6:42 pm

In his 33 years on earth, rock critic Lester Bangs left behind tens of thousands of pages of writing. He died of a drug overdose in 1982 — but this month, at the Kirk Douglas Theatre in Culver City, Calif., Bangs and his ideas are coming to life on stage in the new one-man play How to Be a Rock Critic.

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Music Interviews
7:35 am
Sat June 20, 2015

Son Lux, The Perennial One-Man Band, On Teaming Up

Son Lux's new album, Bones, comes out June 23.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat June 20, 2015 10:40 am

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The Two-Way
6:17 pm
Thu June 18, 2015

The Victims: 9 Were Slain At Charleston's Emanuel AME Church

Charleston residents visit a makeshift memorial for victims of Wednesday's mass shooting at the Emanuel AME Church on Calhoun Steet in Charleston, S.C.
Randall Hill Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Sat June 20, 2015 8:44 pm

The nine people who were killed in a mass shooting at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, S.C., on Wednesday have been identified by the authorities.

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Author Interviews
6:27 pm
Sun June 14, 2015

'You Couldn't Make This Stuff Up': Inside The Lives Of The 'China Rich'

Lydia Thompson NPR

Originally published on Mon June 15, 2015 1:06 pm

In his 2014 novel Crazy Rich Asians, author Kevin Kwan took readers to Singapore and into the lives of Asia's elite, who live in a world of opulence so extreme, it's absurd.

The novel became an international best-seller, with a movie in the works.

Now those Crazy Rich Asians are back as a mix of old and new characters in Kwan's new novel, China Rich Girlfriend.

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Health
6:18 pm
Sun June 14, 2015

'Man With The Golden Arm' Donates Blood That Has Saved 2 Million Babies

James Harrison was recognized in 2003 with the Guinness World Record for the most blood donated by one person.
DAVID GRAY Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Mon June 15, 2015 11:20 am

When James Harrison was 14, he got really sick. One of his lungs had to be removed, and he needed a lot of blood.

"I was in the hospital for three months and I had 100 stitches," he recalls.

After receiving 13 units — almost 2 gallons — of donated blood, Harrison knew right away that he wanted to give back.

"I was always looking forward to donating, right from the operation, because I don't know how many people it took to save my life," he says. "I never met them, didn't know them."

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Music Interviews
5:13 pm
Sun June 14, 2015

The Hills Are Alive: Maria Schneider Lets Memory Guide The Music

Maria Schneider's latest album is The Thompson Fields.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun June 14, 2015 10:41 pm

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Music
2:03 am
Sun June 14, 2015

Charlie Hunter: One Less String Attached

Charlie Hunter.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun June 14, 2015 11:02 am

The last time Charlie Hunter came to the NPR studios, he brought an eight-string guitar with fanned-out frets that included bass strings. He's now pared down to just seven strings, but his guitar still produces a big, fat sound. Let The Bells Ring On is Hunter's new album, and it features two jazz innovators: trombonist Curtis Fowlkes and drummer Bobby Previte. It's a record that goes every which way, but in places is rooted in gospel and the music on which he grew up.

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Sports
5:51 pm
Sat June 13, 2015

Academic Foul: Some Colleges Accused Of Helping Athletes Cheat

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill faces charges of NCAA violations including the existence of sham classes and grade inflation for student-athletes.
Gerry Broome AP

Originally published on Sat June 13, 2015 6:21 pm

Some college athletes are cheating, and the NCAA is cracking down on universities that enable them to do it. Earlier this year, the NCAA came down hard on Syracuse University for academic fraud.

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Author Interviews
5:51 pm
Sat June 13, 2015

'Seven Good Years' Between The Birth Of A Son, Death Of A Father

Lydia Thompson NPR

Originally published on Sat June 13, 2015 6:21 pm

Israeli writer Etgar Keret is beloved around the world for his funny, haunting and frequently fantastical short stories. But he's hardly one to stick to a single medium: on top of his stories, he's written graphic novels, TV shows, movie scripts and a children's book. And public radio fans may know his work from its numerous appearances on This American Life.

But for 25 years — whether in print, on air, on screen or in comic-book form — he only wrote fiction.

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Music Interviews
8:01 am
Sat June 13, 2015

'Anything Goes' On Alpine's 'Yuck'

The Australian band Alpine made waves at South by Southwest a couple of years ago. Their new album, Yuck, comes out on Tuesday.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon June 15, 2015 11:46 am

The Australian sextet Alpine created a sensation at South by Southwest a couple of years ago, following the 2012 release of their debut album A Is for Alpine. Their newest collection, set for release on Tuesday, has a more bracing title: Yuck.

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