Neva Hill

Neva Hill is in her 16th year as a political commentator for KOSU.

Hill been professionally active in Oklahoma Republican politics and journalism for 30 years. She is the owner and president of Neva Hill & Company, a full-service political consulting and public relations firm located in south Oklahoma City. Currently, Hill is a consultant to a number of federal, statewide, county, and legislative officeholders across Oklahoma. She has also been a political analyst for OETA-TV election night coverage the last four years.

She was also the publisher and editor of The Hill Report, an insider’s report on Oklahoma politics and government which ended 26 years of weekly print publication when it was sold to an online political newsletter owned by Mike McCarville in the fall of 2006. 

In 2004, she was named one of three Oklahoma women to serve on the National Steering Committee for “W Stands for Women” – along with then-Lt. Governor Mary Fallin and Terry Neese, president of Women Impacting Public Policy. In 1992, Neva served as State Director of the Bush-Quayle campaign.

Hill served as Assistant Commissioner of Labor for the State of Oklahoma in 1987 under Governor Henry Bellmon. The following year she managed the successful state senate campaign for Tom Cole, who now represents Oklahoma’s Fourth District in the United States Congress.

Ways to Connect

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and former House Speaker Steve Lewis about a 300-page bipartisan review of Oklahoma's death penalty process and a task force to look into untested rape kits in the state.

The trio also discusses the current state of the legislature with just four weeks left in the session and the increase in the number of people officially running for statewide office in 2018.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel first off about the tragic news on the passing of State Representative David Brumbaugh of Broken Arrow, the first set of revenue raising bills passes out of a committee, and a coalition of 21 state groups provide a budget suggestion to fill a budget shortfall and run state government.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the state having to once again borrow money, this time $31M to pay for operational expenses, lawmakers sending Governor Fallin a measure to end tax credits for the wind industry this summer rather than in 2021 and an e-mail causes controversy when it warns House pages of "crossdressers" in the building.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the state legislature reaching the halfway point in the session, leaders of the House and Senate announce they hope to limit cuts to common education to little or nothing in the upcoming fiscal year and Scott Pruitt faces an investigation by the Oklahoma Bar Association on accusations of lying to a U.S. Senate committee during his confirmation hearing to head the Environmental Protection Agency.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill about the Office of Management and Enterprise Services announcing it had taken $240M from the state's Rainy Day Fund to pay for operating expenses and the House heats up with a bill to provide a $34M supplemental appropriation to the Department of Human Services.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about Senator Ralph Shortey who resigned his position at the State Capitol after he was charged with three felony counts of child prostitution, 430,000 Oklahomans might have had their identities stolen after a website for people applying for state jobs got hacked & lawmakers reach a deadline for bills to be out of their chambers of origin.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the passing of political commentator and journalist Mike McCarville, the State Supreme Court dismisses a challenge against its newest justice Patrick Wyrick and Sallisaw Republican Representative John Bennett requires participants of Muslim Day to fill out a controversial questionnaire over the Islamic religion.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the revenue failure announced by officials last week causing Standard and Poor's to drop Oklahoma's credit rating, the State Supreme Court hears arguments from attorneys over the eligibility of its newest justice, Patrick Wyrick, and the Governor gets the bill to bring Oklahoma in compliance with the 2005 Federal Real ID Act.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill about the $34M revenue failure facing state agencies as well as the $787M budget shortfall facing state lawmakers, Oklahoma City Mayor Mick Cornett announces he will not seek a fifth term as leader of the state's capital city and lawmakers fast track a bill to get the state in compliance with the Federal Real ID Act.

This Week in Oklahoma, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about a controversy and lawsuit against the newest member of the State Supreme Court, Patrick Wyrick, over discrepancies on his application to the high court, Lieutenant Governor Todd Lamb announces he's retiring from the Governor's cabinet over a disagreement on extending the state's sales tax to services and Republican Senator Ralph Shortey gets an earful from participants in a town hall he held to talk about his bills which would make changes t

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