Michael Cross

Morning Edition host

Michael Cross has been with KOSU since 2008, working as the state capitol bureau chief for seven years, as well as KOSU's student coordinator.  While he still keeps up with the capitol and does some reporting, his roles have changed.  As of October 2014, he's now the host of KOSU's Morning Edition.

He came to KOSU after several years in broadcast media, working at KTOK, KOKH Fox 25, KOCO Channel 5 and KWTV News 9. Michael has his degree in Broadcasting and Journalism from the University of Central Oklahoma as well as an Associates in Theatre Arts from Oklahoma City Community College. One of his hobbies includes performing on the stage having spent time with Oklahoma Shakespeare in the Park dating back to 1989.

Ways to Connect

  More than 25,000 Oklahomans made their way to the Capitol on Monday to show support for Education.

The crowd included educators, parents, students and supporters from all corners of the state.

The chanting of more than 25,000 people fills the area south of the Capitol as the crowd stretches from the large steps past the dormant oil rig known as Petunia One and into the visitor parking lot.

Most of the attendees are wearing red to support education.

Dawna Watkins comes from Justus-Tiawah in Claremore.

Michael Cross

The Blues: When most people hear it they think of Memphis or Chicago or New Orleans even Kansas City. But, there’s a resurgence of the blues in Oklahoma focusing on the present as well as the past.

Just off I-40 and Highway 69 north of Checotah sits the small town of Rentiesville. The historic black town of just 99 people includes the Oklahoma Blues Hall of Fame in an old bar which opened in 1936.

Meet Miss Sally

Jan 9, 2013
Michael Cross

It’s not unusual to drive into a small town and find an old fashioned diner, but Sally’s Sandwich Shop in Pawhuska has an interesting story.

The owner, Sally Carroll took over the place in 1949 and is still working behind the counter to this day.

Walking into Sally’s Sandwich Shop in downtown Pawhuska might not seem any different than any other small diner in any other small town.

Local men and women sit at a bar which stretches about 30 feet in a room which isn’t any wider than maybe 15 feet.

It's been so hot and dry this summer that climatologists say the southern part of the United States is going through an "exceptional drought."

Parts of Oklahoma have seen little rain since October — not to mention a string of 100-degree days. The steamy conditions are pressuring the state's water needs.

About 1.2 million people live in the Oklahoma City metropolitan area, and they are putting a drain on the city's water supplies.

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