Michael Cross

Morning Edition host

Michael Cross has been with KOSU since 2008, working as the state capitol bureau chief for seven years, as well as KOSU's student coordinator.  While he still keeps up with the capitol and does some reporting, his roles have changed.  As of October 2014, he's now the host of KOSU's Morning Edition.

He came to KOSU after several years in broadcast media, working at KTOK, KOKH Fox 25, KOCO Channel 5 and KWTV News 9. Michael has his degree in Broadcasting and Journalism from the University of Central Oklahoma as well as an Associates in Theatre Arts from Oklahoma City Community College. One of his hobbies includes performing on the stage having spent time with Oklahoma Shakespeare in the Park dating back to 1989.

Ways to Connect

Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel talk about the death of an inmate behind closed doors after something went wrong in his execution, the governor vetoes House bills after a bond for Capitol repairs fails in that chamber and the state and national Tea Parties are at odd over support for U.S. Senate candidates.

On Wednesday, April 30th, KOSU in collaboration with State Impact Oklahoma and the Oklahoma Public Media Exchange held a discussion at Picasso's cafe in the Paseo District.  

State Impact's Joe Wertz and Logan Layden led the discussion with Oklahoma Association of Conservation Districts Executive Director Clay Pope and David Engle, Director of the Oklahoma Water Resources Center at Oklahoma State University. The packed crowd discussed climate change and protecting the state's valuable land and water.

  Sportscaster and journalist Brent Weber talks to KOSU's Michael Cross about the punishment against LA Clippers owner Donald Sterling, the playoff situation between the Thunder and the Grizzlies, the OKC Barons face must win games against the Texas Stars and the OKC Energy FC makes first home appearance

  Governor Fallin wants to see more substantive work done in by State Representatives saying too many big problems are being ignored.

Fallin vetoed 15 House bills on Tuesday just to prove her point.

Fallin wants the State House to start focusing on what she calls substantive bills like prescription drug abuse, changing the pension system and a bond for capitol repairs.

To get the attention of Representatives she vetoed 15 bills she says are not relevant to the people of Oklahoma.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and former Democratic lawmaker Sid Hudson talk about the testing outage which sent the State Department of Education into damage control more, the Governor is getting her long awaited tax cut bill, a bond issue for Capitol repairs goes down in flames in the State House and the Senate advances a measure to give more money to education.

  This Week in Sports Talk, sportscaster and journalist Brent Weber talks to KOSU's Michael Cross about the playoff series between the Oklahoma City Thunder and the Memphis Grizzlies, the NBA playoffs in general and the playoffs for the Oklahoma City Barons Hockey Team.

In a couple of weeks, more than eighty students are graduating from Oklahoma’s Veterinary School as doctors of veterinary medicine.

KOSU’s Chloe Charlton reports most of them are facing a bleak future, at least in the financial sense.

OSU’s new veterinarians face $200,000 in debt, and with the average starting salary hovering around $45,000, it could take decades to pay these loans back.

In 2008, Oklahoma’s state government agreed to supplement a federal program, encouraging OSU graduates to practice large animal medicine in rural communities.

  The first day of filing for political office ended at the State Capitol Wednesday and saw more people than any opening day in at least 16 years.

419 people filed for federal, state and local positions.

At exactly 8:00, State Election Board Secretary Paul Ziriax makes the announcement.

“May I have your attention please. The 2014 candidate filing period is now open.”

The first man to file, Max Wolfley, came to the Capitol Tuesday afternoon at 4:30 to be first in line to run for the Republican ticket for House District 95.

  The Oklahoma Department of Transportation is raising concerns about a bill heading to the full Senate to take money away from road and bridge projects.

An amended piece of legislation would move the money to common education.

An amendment to House Bill 2642 takes half of the nearly $60 million which would have gone every year to ODOT and gives it to Common Education.

ODOT Director Mike Patterson says while the lack of funding won’t impact work on structurally deficient bridges there are a couple of Oklahoma City projects which could see delays.

  More than 25,000 Oklahomans made their way to the Capitol on Monday to show support for Education.

The crowd included educators, parents, students and supporters from all corners of the state.

The chanting of more than 25,000 people fills the area south of the Capitol as the crowd stretches from the large steps past the dormant oil rig known as Petunia One and into the visitor parking lot.

Most of the attendees are wearing red to support education.

Dawna Watkins comes from Justus-Tiawah in Claremore.

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