KOSU News

The KOSU news team curates news of interest to Oklahomans from various sources around the world. Our hope is inform, educate, and entertain.

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Flickr / biologycorner

The U.S. Department of Education announced today it is reinstating Oklahoma’s No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Flexibility Waiver for the 2014-15 school year.

The NCLB waiver was pulled in August following the repeal of Common Core academic standards by state legislators. At the time, Assistant Education Secretary Deborah Delisle told Oklahoma officials they could "no longer demonstrate that the state's standards are college- and career-ready standards."

The New Yorker looks at Garth Brooks' comeback to country music and wonders where he fits in, thirteen years after the release of his last studio album.

Ryan LaCroix of KOSU, with data from ncsl.org

The Democratic leader in the Oklahoma Senate plans to introduce a bill to help increase voter participation in Oklahoma by allowing citizens to register to vote online.

State Sen. Randy Bass of Lawton held an interim study on the issue Thursday before the Senate Rules Committee and said afterward he planned to sponsor a bill in the upcoming session.

According to the National Conference of State Legislatures, voters in 27 states have the ability for full or limited online registration, but not in Oklahoma.

A new report on early childhood development estimates that nearly a quarter of a million children in Oklahoma were living in poverty in 2012.

The report by the Annie E. Casey Foundation also found that about one-third of the state's kids were living with parents who didn't have steady employment.

The New York Times looks at real estate investments and the subsequent rejuvenation of downtown Tulsa.

Every story has dignity and a uniquely human touch, but some stories are harder to tell than others.

When KOSU opened a studio in Oklahoma City’s Film Row district, we started working one block away from the City Rescue Mission and came in daily contact with the homeless community. We wanted to find a way to tell their story, a story that is mostly untold with dignity.

Now, with your help, we have an opportunity to do that. With the inspiration of programs like StoryCorps and Youth Radio, we are raising funds so the homeless community can tell its story in a very personal way.

KOSU will lend its expertise in radio and sound mixing, and your gift will help recruit members of the homeless community and buy recorders to allow them to tell their own stories. KOSU will then help them mix down the sound into a documentary that we will air and make available for podcast.

A Message About On Point

Nov 6, 2014

Tom Ashbook’s wife, Danielle Guichard-Ashbrook, succumbed after a long, brave battle with cancer Wednesday evening.

Tom and Danielle were high school sweethearts from Illinois. They lived in India, Tokyo and Hong Kong before settling and raising their family in Newton, Massachusetts. Danielle was an associate dean at MIT, and served as Director of the International Students office. She is survived by Tom, their three children and one granddaughter.

Tom will be taking some time off from hosting On Point to be with his family.

Central Oklahomans are deciding the next Congressman from District 5 between state Senator Al McAffrey and former state Senator Steve Russell.

On Wednesday, October 29, KOSU held a forum which was planned to be a debate between the two candidates.

McAffrey showed up, but Russell did not.

We still had a lively discussion with McAffrey at Picasso's Cafe in Oklahoma City's Paseo District.


KOSU will air a debate between the two candidates for Oklahoma State Superintendent of Public Instruction—John Cox and Joy Hofmeister—live on Tuesday, October 28 at 7 p.m. from the Oklahoma State University-Tulsa campus.

The one-hour debate will be held at the OSU-Tulsa Auditorium, 700 N. Greenwood Avenue in downtown Tulsa. OETA managing editor Dick Pryor will moderate the debate.

Flickr / xtrah

An inquiry by the NCAA and an independent investigator has concluded that a Sports Illustrated expose alleging misconduct in the Oklahoma State football program to be "fundamentally unfounded."

The NCAA and the university said Tuesday the joint investigation included nearly 100 interviews and a review of some 50,000 documents and emails. It found three instances that may lead to NCAA infractions:

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