KOSU News

The KOSU news team curates news of interest to Oklahomans from various sources around the world. Our hope is inform, educate, and entertain.

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okstate.com

Updated: September 28, 2017 at 7:22 p.m. CST

Oklahoma State University has terminated associate head basketball coach Lamont Evans for cause, following the filing of multiple fraud and corruption charges.

Evans was charged on Tuesday with bribery conspiracy, solicitation of bribes, honest services fraud conspiracy, honest services fraud, conspiracy to commit wire fraud, and Travel Act conspiracy. He faces up to 80 years in prison if convicted.

Reveal

Oklahoma incarcerates women, many of them mothers, at a rate more than twice the national average.

As the state grapples with an emerging political consensus around criminal justice reform, The Atlantic  and Reveal joined together yesterday in Oklahoma City to discuss female incarceration and criminal justice reform in Oklahoma.

facebook.com/okcpd

Police in Oklahoma City on Tuesday night fatally shot a deaf man who they say was advancing toward them with a metal pipe as witnesses yelled that the man was deaf and could not hear them.

It's the fifth officer-involved shooting in the city this year, according to the Oklahoma City Police Department.

Officers were responding to a hit-and-run accident around 8:15 p.m., Capt. Bo Mathews, the police department's public information officer, told reporters Wednesday. A witness of the accident told police a vehicle involved went to a nearby address.

Marketplace looks maintaining memorials to victims of mass violence and what it takes to keep them relevant years later. The report features the Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum and a memorial to the Edmond Post Office shooting.

We're happy to offer a special way for you to financially support KOSU and help feed hungry children in Oklahoma during the 2017 Fall Membership Drive (taking place between Wednesday, September 13 to Wednesday, September 20).

oksenate.gov

Oklahoma state Senator Bryce Marlatt (R-Woodward) has resigned, effective immediately.

Marlatt was accused of forcefully grabbing his Uber driver and kissing her neck while she was driving him to an Oklahoma City bar on June 26.

The 40-year-old from Woodward was booked into the Oklahoma jail Tuesday morning on one felony count of sexual battery and released on a $5,000 bond. If convicted, he faces up to 10 years in prison.

Marlatt is the seventh lawmaker to resign or announce his resignation since November. The other six include:

oksenate.gov

A Republican state senator from Woodward has been charged with sexual battery over an incident with an Uber driver in June.

State Sen. Bryce Marlatt was charged with a felony in Oklahoma County District Court Wednesday, following an investigation by the Oklahoma City Police Department. Maximum punishment for sexual battery is ten years in prison.

oksenate.gov

A federal grand jury has indicted former state senator Ralph Shortey of Oklahoma City on four felony counts related to child pornography and sex trafficking.

According to the indictment, Shortey faces two counts of transporting child pornography across state lines through email. He also faces a count of producing child pornography and a count of child sex trafficking. Each count carries a mandatory minimum prison sentence, with the maximum sentence being life in prison. He could also be fined more than a million dollars, on top of paying restitution to his victims.

Beginning Monday, October 2, you may notice some changes to the KOSU night and weekend line-up. We’re focusing on what you’ve told us are your favorite shows and hosts, adjusting to changing listening habits and bringing some of the best new up-and-coming shows in public radio to KOSU. We’ve tried to curate an enjoyable listening experience that allows you to seamlessly transition from show to show. We’re thinking about our night and weekend schedules in three distinctive blocks: educational entertainment, weekend vibe entertainment and music discovery.

New York Times reports on the secrecy of Scott Pruitt's Environmental Protection Agency.

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