Kateleigh Mills

Reporter

Kateleigh Mills joined KOSU in March 2018, following her undergraduate degree completion from the University of Central Oklahoma in December 2017.

While studying journalism and professional media, she worked with the UCO’s journalism staff to reinvent the campus newspaper for a more multimedia purpose – joining with the campus radio and television stations for news updates and hosting public forums with campus groups.

The Edmond-raised reporter was editor-in- chief of her college newspaper when it won the Society of Professional Journalism award for Best Newspaper in Category B. Mills also received the Oklahoma Press Association Award for ‘Outstanding Promise in Journalism’ at the Oklahoma Journalism Hall of Fame event in 2017. She is also the Oklahoma Collegiate Media Association's recipient for 'College Newspaper Journalist of the Year' in 2017. 

She is very excited to have joined KOSU in Oklahoma City to provide news to all Oklahoma residents.

Ways to Connect

Kateleigh Mills / KOSU

Women are a key constituency for both of Oklahoma’s major political parties, and an increasing number of women are running for office. But data suggest a majority of Oklahoma women are disappointed with both major political parties.

About 55 percent of women who responded to a political attitudes survey commissioned on behalf of stations for the Oklahoma Engaged project viewed the Democratic party unfavorably compared to about 60 percent for Republicans. That trend is reversed for men, who viewed Democrats more unfavorably.

Jackie Fortier / StateImpact Oklahoma

Polls have closed in Oklahoma. We'll be updating this post as results come in.

Updated 12:28 a.m.

Former Oklahoma City mayor Mick Cornett will face Tulsa businessman Kevin Stitt in a runoff for the Republican nomination for governor.

Cornett, Stitt and Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb were all polling closely leading into Tuesday's primary election. There had to be an odd man out to reach to the runoff. The odd man out was Lamb.

Cornett finished with near 29 percent of the vote. With 1948 of 1951 precincts reporting, Stitt led Lamb 24.43 to 23.88 percent.

Photo Provided

The Oklahoma City Zoo is now a welcome spot for guests with sensory sensitivities.

The Zoo announced the sensory certification on Tuesday.

Spokesperson Candice Rennels says the park partnered with the Alabama-based nonprofit, KultureCity, for sensory inclusive training and other accommodations for guests. Rennels says there will be designated quiet and headphone zones as well as items to check out, like weighted blankets and sensory bags.

OKC Zoo

The Oklahoma City Zoo is adding a new bee program to help pollinate zoo grounds and integrate learning opportunities for guests. 

The program, which has been in the works for over a year, will house four hives in its first year as it continues to grow. The Zoo's security manager, James Lowrey, who studies and cares for bees in his free time, will oversee the program.

"For the first year of the program we are starting with four hives," Lowrey said. "That gives us a chance, especially when teaching, for people to see a lot of different hives, a lot of different situations." 

Travis Caperton / The University of Oklahoma

The Stephenson Cancer Center in Oklahoma City received a National Cancer Institute designation Wednesday, which will help provide more assistance for Oklahomans battling cancer.

At a press conference Wednesday, University of Oklahoma President David Boren said the Stephenson Cancer Center project began 17 years ago when the state legislature created the task for the college.  Since then, the center has used the time to become eligible for NCI designation. 

facebook.com/CongressmanJimBridenstine

Updated: Monday, April 24

 

An Oklahoman is now in charge of the nation’s space program.

 

Former U.S. Representative Jim Bridenstine was sworn in as NASA administrator Monday, Bridenstine was confirmed by the U.S. Senate on a party-line 50–49 vote last week.

 

He had represented Oklahoma’s first congressional district since 2012 before being nominated to lead the space agency by President Donald Trump.

 

City of Oklahoma City

For the first time in 14 years, Oklahoma City has a new mayor.

On Tuesday morning, former state senator David Holt was sworn into office before his first city council meeting.

An Oklahoma City native, Holt is the 36th mayor and is also the first Native American to hold the title. At age 39, he’s also the youngest American leader of a city with more than 500,000 residents.

Flickr / unitedsoybean

As the United States and China propose tariffs on one another, possibly leading to a trade war, one Oklahoma grain specialist is urging Oklahoma agricultural producers to stay focused on the long-term.

Kateleigh Mills / KOSU

Governor Mary Fallin signed a bill into law last week giving educators their first state-funded raise in a decade, but many teachers still plan to walk out of their classrooms today.

Public safety officials expect up to 30,000 people at the Capitol, and among the thousands of teachers and education supporters will be state workers.

twitter.com/okcthunder

The Oklahoma City Thunder added a new player to their ranks Saturday, as preparation begins for the NBA playoffs.

 

Corey Brewer, who agreed to a contract buyout Wednesday with the Los Angeles Lakers, cleared waivers Friday.

 

Pages