Kate Carlton Greer

Reporter

Kate Carlton Greer is a general assignment reporter for KGOU and Oklahoma Public Media Exchange. She previously covered Oklahoma's efforts in tornado response and recovery as part of "Ahead of the Storm: The Oklahoma Tornado Project."

She grew up in Flower Mound, Texas, and studied broadcasting and electronic media at the University of Oklahoma. 

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OKLAHOMA DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Oklahoma's execution practices were under the national spotlight when the 2015 legislative session began. A few weeks after the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to hear a case challenging the state’s three-drug lethal injection cocktail, Oklahoma state Sen. Anthony Sykes, R-Moore, introduced Senate Joint Resolution 31.

'A necessary amendment'

In 1921, the city of Tulsa, Oklahoma, erupted in race riots that left up to 300 people dead. Homes and businesses were burned.

The riot has been mostly ignored by history. But a recent fatal police shooting of an African-American man in Tulsa has re-focused attention on the city’s past.

Bruce Fisher, retired curator of the African-American projects at the Oklahoma Historical Society, and Kate Carlton Greer, a reporter for KGOU, join Here & Now‘s Robin Young to discuss Tulsa’s past and present.

John Durkee / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

Prosecutors filed felony charges Thursday against a Tulsa police officer involved in the shooting death of an unarmed black man. The charges come less than a week after Terence Crutcher was shot Friday.

Oklahoma City police officers can now carry assault rifles when they're on the job. It's made critics concerned about further loss of trust.

TRANSCRIPT:

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

After the police shootings in Dallas and Baton Rouge, police officers have asked for more weapons and for more protective gear. In Oklahoma City, police are now allowed to bring their own private semi-automatic rifles on duty. But as Kate Carlton Greer from member station KGOU reports, that change has sparked concern about the over-militarization of police.

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Gov. Mary Fallin announced a new criminal justice task force Wednesday. The 18-member group wants to have data-driven policy reforms proposed in time for the 2017 legislative session.

Fallin says The Oklahoma Justice Reform Task Force aims to reduce Oklahoma’s prison population while maintaining public safety and controlling the ever-increasing cost of the the state’s corrections system. Annually, Oklahoma pays roughly $500 million to the Department of Corrections.

An Oklahoma inmate died Wednesday night after a disturbance broke out at the Mack Alford Correctional Center in Stringtown.

In a press release describing the incident, Department of Corrections Director Joe Allbaugh called the knife fight “senseless violence” and vowed to look for a motive.

“We have launched a full-scale investigation into the situation,” Allbaugh said. “We will ensure the proper measures are taken to better manage these situations in the future.”

Sue Ogrocki / AP

Oklahoma City Chief of Police Bill Citty offered his condolences to Dallas police following the deadly attack that killed five officers and injured several others at a peaceful Black Lives Matter demonstration Thursday.

Speaking in front of a wall honoring fallen officers at the Oklahoma City Police Department Headquarters, Citty said the department has not received any specific threats ahead of a Black Lives Matter protest in Oklahoma City Sunday evening. 

Kate Carlton Greer / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

Oklahoma’s Department of Corrections begins moving inmates Tuesday to a newly leased private facility in far western Oklahoma, where state employees will run the prison. The agreement between the state and Corrections Corporation of America is a first in Oklahoma’s prison system.

A multicounty grand jury accused an Oklahoma sheriff of corruption Thursday and requested he be immediately removed from office. 

Grand jurors allege Carter County Sheriff Milton Anthony accepted a female employee’s bribe of sexual favors in exchange for hiring her husband as a local deputy. The grand jury did not return an indictment but an accusation for removal instead. 

Governor Mary Fallin on Friday vetoed a bill mandating pardon and parole board hearings for inmates convicted of crimes requiring payment of 85 percent of a sentence. 

House Bill 3159 earned almost unanimous support in both the House and the Senate during the 55th legislative session.

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