Kate Carlton Greer

Reporter

Kate Carlton Greer is a general assignment reporter for KGOU and Oklahoma Public Media Exchange. She previously covered Oklahoma's efforts in tornado response and recovery as part of "Ahead of the Storm: The Oklahoma Tornado Project."

She grew up in Flower Mound, Texas, and studied broadcasting and electronic media at the University of Oklahoma. 

Pages

Local News
5:11 pm
Sun July 26, 2015

Oklahoma Takes A Hard Look At What Police Seize — And How It's Spent

Originally published on Mon July 27, 2015 2:03 pm

In Oklahoma, some people in charge of enforcing the law seem to be skirting it. State audits have found people in district attorney offices have used seized money and property to live rent-free and pay off student loans.

When state Sen. Kyle Loveless first heard about the audits, he'd already been thinking about amending the civil asset forfeiture laws — mainly because the state doesn't always follow the law.

Read more
Local News
8:22 am
Tue July 21, 2015

New Survey Reveals Poverty Indicators Worsening For Oklahoma Children, Teens

Annie E. Casey Foundation

Oklahoma ranks in the bottom quarter of states in childhood wellbeing according to an annual survey out Tuesday morning from the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

The state's placement remained steady from last year.

The Kids Count Data Book shows 24 percent of Oklahoma children live in poverty, and the new survey ranks the state 39th in the nation when it comes to the overall wellbeing of children.

Read more
Local News
7:47 pm
Thu July 16, 2015

Obama Praises El Reno Prison's Programs, Calls For Corrections Reform

President Obama tours the El Reno Federal Correctional Institution
Kate Carlton Greer / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

President Obama became the first sitting president to visit a federal prison Thursday when he toured the El Reno Federal Correctional Institution outside Oklahoma City. During his trip, Obama urged reconsideration of the current criminal justice system.

President Obama walked down Cell Block B, taking in the two-story medium security prison, with a corrections officer and Federal Bureau of Prisons Director Charles Samuels. He peeked inside a tiny 90 square foot cell that holds up to three inmates, which he said highlights the need for prison reform.

Read more
Local News
4:42 pm
Mon July 13, 2015

Lawyers, Others Seek To Exonerate Oklahoma Death Row Inmate

Richard Glossip
Credit Oklahoma Department of Corrections

Lawyers for an Oklahoma death row inmate are searching for ways to exonerate a man scheduled to die in September. The execution will be the first after the Supreme Court’s ruling that upheld the use of the controversial drug midazolam.

Richard Glossip has maintained his innocence since he was convicted of first-degree murder in the 1997 death of Oklahoma City motel owner Barry Van Treese. Don Knight is a Colorado-based attorney who has taken up Glossip’s case. He says the evidence against Glossip is paper-thin and the case itself never should have qualified for the death penalty.

Read more
OKC Bombing: 20 Years Later
11:51 am
Mon April 13, 2015

Mental Health Issues Linger For Oklahoma City Bombing Survivors, Responders

Paul Heath, 80, stands in front of the Oklahoma City Bombing Memorial. He was in his fifth floor office of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building the day of the explosion in 1995.
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

 

Paul Heath walks around the Oklahoma City National Memorial grounds, greeting visitors and making sure everyone has information about a self-guided tour.

Heath is a retired psychologist for the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. His office was on the fifth floor of the Murrah Building when the bomb exploded. The floor collapsed two feet in front of him.

“Here's what I actually thought, ‘God I don't want to die. I don't want to die today. If it's alright with you, I'll die later,’” Heath says. “That's exactly what I thought, and I was looking straight in the bomb pit.”

Read more
Local News
1:00 pm
Sat March 28, 2015

Oklahoma University Reveals Sigma Alpha Epsilon Investigation Results

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Read more
Race
4:38 pm
Mon March 9, 2015

Oklahoma University Fraternity Closed After Racist Chant Video Posted

Originally published on Tue March 10, 2015 5:56 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Read more
Local News
7:46 am
Mon February 16, 2015

Helping Former Prisoners Deal with Debt

For many convicted felons leaving Oklahoma prisons, repaying their debt to society means paying down a mountain of actual debt from court costs, fines and fees.

As OPMX’s Kate Carlton Greer reports in the final part of a collaboration between KOSU and Oklahoma Watch’s called Prisoners of Debt, keeping former inmates from re-offending and returning to prison often depends on help available when they’re released.

Men and women clutch binders and sack lunches as they shuffle into a cafeteria and catch up before the day begins.

They’re all participants at TEEM, The Employment and Education Ministry, in Oklahoma City. It’s a non-violent prisoner re-entry program that helps offenders find jobs and get plugged back into society.

Read more
Politics
8:19 am
Mon February 9, 2015

The Growing Fines and Fees for Oklahomans Breaking Laws

For more than two decades, Oklahoma has turned to fines and fees instead of state appropriations to fund the court system.

In the second part of a three-part series with Oklahoma Watch, OPMX’s Kate Carlton Greer says the debt former prisoners now face has becoming increasingly burdensome as the state has grown more and more reluctant to raise taxes.

The roots of Oklahoma’s crime-funded court system start back in 1992 with State Question 640.

The public was mad about tax hikes, so they passed a referendum making it nearly impossible for lawmakers to raise taxes.

Legislators then began turning to other ways to pad the state budget, like fines and fees.

Read more
Politics
8:11 am
Tue February 3, 2015

Democrats React to Governor's State of the State

Scott Inman

Oklahoma lawmakers gathered for the first official day of the legislative session Monday to hear Governor Mary Fallin’s annual State of the State address.

As the Oklahoma Public Media Exchange’s Kate Carlton Greer reports, the Democratic Party praised the governor for finding focus in her initiatives.

Democratic Minority Leader Scott Inman described his party as being cautiously optimistic following the Fallin’s call to concentrate on education, healthcare and criminal justice reform this legislative session.

Read more

Pages