Kate Carlton Greer

Reporter

Kate Carlton Greer is a general assignment reporter for KGOU and Oklahoma Public Media Exchange. She previously covered Oklahoma's efforts in tornado response and recovery as part of "Ahead of the Storm: The Oklahoma Tornado Project."

She grew up in Flower Mound, Texas, and studied broadcasting and electronic media at the University of Oklahoma. 

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Race
4:38 pm
Mon March 9, 2015

Oklahoma University Fraternity Closed After Racist Chant Video Posted

Originally published on Tue March 10, 2015 5:56 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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Local News
7:46 am
Mon February 16, 2015

Helping Former Prisoners Deal with Debt

For many convicted felons leaving Oklahoma prisons, repaying their debt to society means paying down a mountain of actual debt from court costs, fines and fees.

As OPMX’s Kate Carlton Greer reports in the final part of a collaboration between KOSU and Oklahoma Watch’s called Prisoners of Debt, keeping former inmates from re-offending and returning to prison often depends on help available when they’re released.

Men and women clutch binders and sack lunches as they shuffle into a cafeteria and catch up before the day begins.

They’re all participants at TEEM, The Employment and Education Ministry, in Oklahoma City. It’s a non-violent prisoner re-entry program that helps offenders find jobs and get plugged back into society.

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Politics
8:19 am
Mon February 9, 2015

The Growing Fines and Fees for Oklahomans Breaking Laws

For more than two decades, Oklahoma has turned to fines and fees instead of state appropriations to fund the court system.

In the second part of a three-part series with Oklahoma Watch, OPMX’s Kate Carlton Greer says the debt former prisoners now face has becoming increasingly burdensome as the state has grown more and more reluctant to raise taxes.

The roots of Oklahoma’s crime-funded court system start back in 1992 with State Question 640.

The public was mad about tax hikes, so they passed a referendum making it nearly impossible for lawmakers to raise taxes.

Legislators then began turning to other ways to pad the state budget, like fines and fees.

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Politics
8:11 am
Tue February 3, 2015

Democrats React to Governor's State of the State

Scott Inman

Oklahoma lawmakers gathered for the first official day of the legislative session Monday to hear Governor Mary Fallin’s annual State of the State address.

As the Oklahoma Public Media Exchange’s Kate Carlton Greer reports, the Democratic Party praised the governor for finding focus in her initiatives.

Democratic Minority Leader Scott Inman described his party as being cautiously optimistic following the Fallin’s call to concentrate on education, healthcare and criminal justice reform this legislative session.

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Local News
7:50 am
Tue February 3, 2015

Convicted Oklahomans Deal with Debt

Over the years, Oklahoma has increasingly turned to fines and fees from court cases to pay for the court system itself.

But a joint investigation with Oklahoma Watch reveals that as many inmates regain their freedom, they’re still imprisoned by mountains of debt.

As the Oklahoma Public Media Exchange’s Kate Carlton Greer reports in the first of a series, the cost shift is leading some to question the long-term sustainability of a crime-funded judicial branch.

Robin Wertz left prison back in 2007 facing nearly 25-thousand dollars worth of fines and fees related to multiple drug offenses. Without any real job prospects, Wertz knew she could make a phone call out west and earn some quick money to help her with her savings account while she found a job.

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Oklahoma Tornado Project
9:03 am
Mon September 29, 2014

School Shelter Advocacy Group Puts Forth "Last Ditch Effort" For Signatures

David Slane and Danni Legg (center) ask the public for petition signatures as a "last ditch effort" to get a school safe room issue on a future ballot.
Kate Carlton Greer Oklahoma Tornado Project

A group that wants storm shelters in every Oklahoma school has spent the last 90 days gathering signatures to get its initiative petition on the ballot. Take Shelter Oklahoma is still tens of thousands of signatures short of the required amount, but  proponents now have more time than they originally thought. 

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Oklahoma Tornado Project
9:04 am
Mon September 22, 2014

United Way Tornado Donations Rebuild Homes And Promote Physical, Mental Health

Ben and Kristen Jones stand on their empty lot that Rebuilding Together OKC is building using United Way tornado donations.
Kate Carlton Greer Oklahoma Tornado Project

In the wake of last year’s devastating tornadoes, millions of dollars in donations went to The United Way of Central Oklahoma. The non-profit organization also agreed to administer Governor Mary Fallin’s Oklahoma Strong tornado relief campaign. Together, the funds raised a total of $20 million. 

One week after the tornado hit the city of Moore in May of 2013, country singer Blake Shelton showed up to host a benefit concert called Healing in the Heartland.

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Oklahoma Tornado Project
10:56 am
Mon September 15, 2014

Moore's Rush To Rebuild Left Hundreds Of Homes With A Lesser Building Code

The City of Moore's Shane Speegle inspects one home that is subject to the city's newer, more stringent building code.
Kate Carlton Greer Oklahoma Tornado Project

This March, Moore, Oklahoma became the first city in the nation to adopt a tornado-specific building code. City officials wanted homes to be able to withstand an EF-2 or EF-3 tornado.

But six months after the new regulations took effect, it turns out not all new homes built in the tornado’s path will have these upgrades.

Last week, on a block near Moore’s rebuilt Plaza Towers Elementary School, city official Shane Speegle walked through one house that had just been framed to check the progress.

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Oklahoma Tornado Project
8:00 am
Mon September 8, 2014

Insurance Increase: Homeowners' Premiums Skyrocket After Oklahoma's 2013 Tornadoes

StateFarm Flickr Creative Commons

After a series of severe storms swept through the state in May of last year, insurance carriers paid out over $1 billion in claims, making it the nation’s most costly disaster of 2013.

Most insurance issues have now been settled, but many homeowners are looking at higher rates than they were paying before the storm.


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Oklahoma Tornado Project
8:52 am
Wed September 3, 2014

Without FEMA Funds, Numerous Oklahoma Counties Sit On Expired Disaster Plans

Grady County's emergency manager Dale Thompson is in charge of updating a county-wide hazard mitigation plan, identifying each hazard the area faces.
Kate Carlton Greer Oklahoma Tornado Project

With threats ranging from ice storms to tornadoes, Oklahoma ranks first in the nation in the number of presidentially declared disasters over the past 14 years.

That’s why the state says it's important for local officials to maintain hazard mitigation plans, explaining the steps they're taking to reduce or eliminate their risks. But keeping things up-to-date has proven tough. 

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