Kate Carlton Greer


Kate Carlton Greer is a general assignment reporter for KGOU and Oklahoma Public Media Exchange. She previously covered Oklahoma's efforts in tornado response and recovery as part of "Ahead of the Storm: The Oklahoma Tornado Project."

She grew up in Flower Mound, Texas, and studied broadcasting and electronic media at the University of Oklahoma. 

Ways to Connect

Kate Carlton Greer / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

Oklahoma’s Department of Corrections says one of its biggest challenges is recruiting and retaining employees.

During an interim study Wednesday, Prison Director Joe Allbaugh told lawmakers turnover for the agency is roughly 28 percent. Correctional officers in particular, Allbaugh said, are even harder to retain. Turnover for those positions is approaching 40 percent.

He blamed the high-stress nature of the job combined with low-pay and long hours and said many cadets have a false idea of what being a prison officer entails.  


The state auditor’s office released findings Tuesday from an investigation into the Oklahoma County Sheriff’s office. The findings say the sheriff’s office unlawfully spent department funds under Whetsel’s leadership.

According to the review, the department failed to pay healthcare contracts even though money was available at the time. Auditors also determined Whetsel purchased nearly one million dollars worth of vehicles while other obligations weren’t met.

Kate Carlton Greer / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

Oklahoma’s prisons are crowded, and the state continues to incarcerate offenders at the second- highest rate in the nation, according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics. Two state questions on the November 8 ballot aim to ease both of those strains.  

Gov. Mary Fallin says she'll still vote for Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump even after his 2005 comments that came to light Friday. In a press conference Monday, Fallin said she believes Trump's “vision for America” is better than Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton’s.


The Oklahoma Senate Judiciary Committee met Monday to study eyewitness misidentification in criminal cases.

State Sen. David Holt, R-Oklahoma City, called an interim study to look at best practices in reforming Oklahoma’s eyewitness ID procedures. Eyewitness identification used to be an ideal tool for convicting criminals, but recent studies have shown witness testimony to be flawed in many cases.


Oklahoma's execution practices were under the national spotlight when the 2015 legislative session began. A few weeks after the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to hear a case challenging the state’s three-drug lethal injection cocktail, Oklahoma state Sen. Anthony Sykes, R-Moore, introduced Senate Joint Resolution 31.

'A necessary amendment'

In 1921, the city of Tulsa, Oklahoma, erupted in race riots that left up to 300 people dead. Homes and businesses were burned.

The riot has been mostly ignored by history. But a recent fatal police shooting of an African-American man in Tulsa has re-focused attention on the city’s past.

Bruce Fisher, retired curator of the African-American projects at the Oklahoma Historical Society, and Kate Carlton Greer, a reporter for KGOU, join Here & Now‘s Robin Young to discuss Tulsa’s past and present.

John Durkee / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

Prosecutors filed felony charges Thursday against a Tulsa police officer involved in the shooting death of an unarmed black man. The charges come less than a week after Terence Crutcher was shot Friday.

Oklahoma City police officers can now carry assault rifles when they're on the job. It's made critics concerned about further loss of trust.



After the police shootings in Dallas and Baton Rouge, police officers have asked for more weapons and for more protective gear. In Oklahoma City, police are now allowed to bring their own private semi-automatic rifles on duty. But as Kate Carlton Greer from member station KGOU reports, that change has sparked concern about the over-militarization of police.

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Gov. Mary Fallin announced a new criminal justice task force Wednesday. The 18-member group wants to have data-driven policy reforms proposed in time for the 2017 legislative session.

Fallin says The Oklahoma Justice Reform Task Force aims to reduce Oklahoma’s prison population while maintaining public safety and controlling the ever-increasing cost of the the state’s corrections system. Annually, Oklahoma pays roughly $500 million to the Department of Corrections.