Emily Wendler

Reporter

Emily Wendler joined KOSU in February 2015, following graduate school at the University of Montana.

While studying Environmental Science and Natural Resource Journalism with an emphasis on agriculture, a professor introduced her to radio and she fell in love.

The Cincinnati native has since reported for KBGA, University of Montana’s college radio station, and Montana’s PBS Newsbrief. She was a finalist in a national in-depth radio reporting competition for an investigatory piece she produced on campus rape. She also produced in-depth reports on wind energy and local food for Montana Public Radio.

She is very excited to be working in Oklahoma City, and you can hear her work on all things from education to agriculture right here on KOSU.

Ways to Connect

Emily Wendler / KOSU

Epic Virtual Charter School has been operating in Oklahoma since 2011, and just opened a new location in Orange County, California a few months ago. However, local superintendents in the O.C. area already want Epic shut down.

Officials from the Anaheim Union High School District and Anaheim Elementary School District have filed a lawsuit against the Orange County Board of Education for approving Epic’s charter in November 2015, despite staff recommendations not to. They say the charter was approved illegally and in violation of California’s Charter School Act.

twitter.com/oksde

The Oklahoma State Department of Education has released its plan for a revised A through F School Report Card system.

Schools will still receive an A, B, C, D, or F based on their performance on test scores. But now other factors—graduation rates, chronic absenteeism, and academic growth—will be included in the grades.

Emily Wendler / KOSU

Oklahoma public schools are on the ropes after years of budget cuts.  Four-day school weeks and more. We’ll take it as a big case study and and look at Donald Trump’s new education secretary.

Oklahoma City Public Schools

Two Oklahoma City Community College employees have resigned amid an investigation into academic fraud at the school.

In August, an OCCC employee told authorities that her supervisor was altering test scores and enrollment information, which would reflect inflated numbers in order to gain money for state and federal grants.

Emily Wendler / KOSU

Oklahoma’s teacher shortage may get worse before it gets better. State Question 779, which some hailed as a solution to Oklahoma’s education funding woes, failed on Election Day. Many of the teachers running for office were also defeated. These losses have left some Oklahoma educators feeling hopeless.

Shawna Mott-Wright, the vice president of the Tulsa Public Schools teacher's union, said State Question 779 was the straw that broke the camel's back.

"Teachers are heartbroken," she said. 

twitter.com/oksde

State Superintendent Joy Hofmeister is asking Oklahomans for input as she creates a strategic education plan for Oklahoma schools.

The new Every Student Succeeds Act, or ESSA, ultimately rolls back the federal government’s footprint in state education policy. However, the law requires each state to submit a plan for academic goals and school accountability in order to receive federal funding.

Josh Robinson

Oklahoma City Public Schools superintendent Aurora Lora thanked voters yesterday for approving a $180 million bond issue.

"You know, it's been really wonderful. My phone was dinging all night with people just reaching out saying they're so happy for the school district,” Lora said during a news conference. “And for the teachers and students, just so that we're going to be able to address the issues that we've got, and really get focused on academics now.”

Emily Wendler

Oklahoma’s teacher caucus did not fare as well as they had hoped. Of 26 teachers running for office in the state— five won.

  • Rhonda Baker (R) - HD60
  • Forrest Bennett (D) - HD92
  • Mickey Dollens (D) - HD93
  • Michael Bergstrom (R) - SD01
  • Chris Kidd (R) - SD31

Months ago, educators decided to run for office in an effort to affect the education policies coming out of the legislature.

Emily Wendler / KOSU

State Superintendent Joy Hofmeister has pleaded not guilty to four charges Friday morning that allege she violated campaign fundraising laws in 2013 and 2014. 

Hofmeister was booked into the Oklahoma County Jail at 9:35 a.m. Friday. She was released on an $8,000 bond.

Online Oklahoma County court records show that Hofmeister made a brief appearance before Special Judge Russell Hall, who scheduled a preliminary hearing conference in the case for Dec. 13.

ok.gov/sde/superintendent

State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Joy Hofmeister, was charged Thursday with multiple felonies for violating campaign fundraising laws. Hofmeister denies any wrongdoing and said she will fight the charges.

“I will vigorously defend my integrity and reputation against any suggestion of wrongdoing and fight the allegations that have been made against me,” she said at a press conference Thursday evening.

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