David Dye

David Dye is a longtime Philadelphia radio personality whose music enthusiasm has captivated listeners of World Cafe® since 1991. World Cafeis produced by WXPN, the public radio service of the University of Pennsylvania.

Dye launched his distinguished broadcasting career as host of a progressive music show on WMMR 93.3 FM, a pioneering progressive rock station in Philadelphia. During his four-year tenure, Dye won accolades for his taste and laid back presentation. After a five-year stint programming radio stations in Maine, he returned to Philadelphia where he gained public radio experience at WHYY before being recruited in 1981 by alternative rock station WIOQ 102.1 FM where he made his mark on the music scene for nearly a decade.

In 1989, Dye took his musical quest to WXPN where he hosted the station's Sleepy Hollow radio program. Two years later, Dye was asked to spearhead research on the viability of a new public radio program. The research revealed an audience need for a new kind of musical format - one that was intelligent, diverse and would give musical guests a showcase for their artistic expression. Based on the findings, Dye went to work to create a unique program of musical discovery where listeners would be introduced to an eclectic blend of contemporary sounds from legendary and up-and-coming artists. World Cafewas born.

Since launching World Cafein 1991, Dye has served as the host of this nationally acclaimed show, now syndicated on more than 250 public radio stations across the United States. Every week, Dye brings out the best in interviews with internationally known artists such as Yo-Yo Ma and Joni Mitchell. He has conducted nearly 4,500 interviews during his 20 years with the program. He introduces a half-million listeners each week to newcomers like Vampire Weekend, Mumford & Sons, PJ Harvey, Sheryl Crow, Beck, LCD Soundsystem and Amos Lee.

World Cafe and Dye have received numerous awards including: two NFCB Gold Reel Awards, Album Network's "Best Triple A Air Talent," five Philadelphia Magazine's "Best of Philly Awards," the Philadelphia Chapter of NARAS "Hero Award," the ASCAP Deems Taylor Award and numerous radio industry trade magazine citations. In 2006, Dye was named the "Triple A Air Personality of the Year" by Radio & Records.

Even if you've never heard of Memphis' Royal Studios, you probably know some of the records made there. Royal was the home studio of Hi Records and producer Willie Mitchell in the '70s; it's the birthplace of countless Al Green hits, including "Tired Of Being Alone" and "Let's Stay Together," as well as records by Ann Peebles, Syl Johnson and others.

Gov't Mule On World Cafe

Jun 8, 2017

Gov't Mule recently released its 10th album, Revolution Come...Revolution Go, recorded mostly during sessions in Austin, Texas. The original trio — guitarist and singer Warren Haynes, the late bassist Allen Woody and drummer Matt Abts — started playing as a side project in 1994, when Haynes and Woody were members of The Allman Brothers Band.

Mac DeMarco On World Cafe

May 24, 2017

Mac DeMarco is just turning 27, but his new album, This Old Dog, seems to represent a more mature persona than he's projected in the past. Originally from Edmonton, Alberta, DeMarco has always been known for bringing the party — and then taking it over the top. But when his father (with whom he's had a difficult relationship for most of his life) became ill, DeMarco wrote the more sober "My Old Man" for him, thinking he was not going to recover.

In this session, Delta Spirit frontman Matthew Logan Vasquez and his touring band perform songs from his second solo album, Does What He Wants. The new album was recorded in a trailer in Dripping Springs, Texas, during a difficult time for Vasquez. Last year, after running into financial problems, Vasquez, his wife and their infant son moved in with his mother so that the family could get a fresh start.

While preparing for my departure from World Cafe as full-time host, I've been looking back on the last 25 years of the show.

GEORGE SALISBURY / COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

For 30 years, Wayne Coyne of The Flaming Lips has been pulling musical ideas from his giant hamster ball, guiding his merry band through creative ups and downs.

The 1970s was an incredibly diverse decade for recorded music: from hippie folk at the start to disco, punk, the rise of reggae and the very first stirrings of hip-hop. At the beginning of the decade, Frank Sinatra had a song on the charts for 122 weeks. There was soft rock, metal and country. Album sales and progressive radio were huge.

All this is true. That's why it is so fascinating to look at the songs that ended up at the very top of Billboard's pop chart for each year of the decade — they certainly don't always represent all the change that was going on.

Jain On World Cafe

Mar 6, 2017

Jain's debut album, Zanaka, is an irresistible, eclectic pop record with a freshness to its songs. At 25 years old, the French singer has traveled and lived all over the world, including childhood stints in Dubai, Abu Dhabi and the Republic of the Congo. Along the way, she discovered African percussion and rhythms, which permeate the tracks on her new album and in this one-woman performance. Watch it in the video below and stream the complete session in the player above.

Here's something that shouldn't be news: We love sharing new music with you on World Cafe. And just in case you miss the show, or feel like diving into some after-hours extracurricular discovery, we've assembled a handy-dandy Spotify playlist with some of our favorite new jams just for you.

We'll be updating the playlist as we dig through the never-ending stacks of CDs that populate our desks, and we hope you enjoy these tunes as much as we do.

There are 10 films nominated for Best Picture at this Sunday's Academy Awards. Only one is a musical — and it has a good chance of winning. If La La Land does take home the honors, Justin Hurwitz, who wrote the music that is so central to the film, will probably take to the stage alongside director Damien Chazelle, his friend since their college days at Harvard. (Hurwitz is also nominated for three Oscars himself: for Best Original Score and twice for Best Original Song.)

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