Barbara Bradley Hagerty

Barbara Bradley Hagerty is the religion correspondent for NPR, reporting on the intersection of faith and politics, law, science and culture. Her New York Times best-selling book, "Fingerprints of God: The Search for the Science of Spirituality," was published by Riverhead/Penguin Group in May 2009. Among others, Barb has received the American Women in Radio and Television Award, the Headliners Award and the Religion Newswriters Association Award for radio reporting.

Before covering the religion beat, Barb was NPR's Justice Department correspondent between 1998 and 2003. Her billet included the impeachment proceedings against President Clinton, Florida's disputed 2000 election, terrorism, crime, espionage, wrongful convictions and the occasional serial killer. Barbara was the lead correspondent covering the investigation into the September 11 attacks. Her reporting was part of NPR's coverage that earned the network the 2001 George Foster Peabody and Overseas Press Club awards. She has appeared on the PBS programs Washington Week and The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer.

Barb came to NPR in 1995, after attending Yale Law School on a one-year Knight Fellowship. From 1982-1993, she worked at The Christian Science Monitor as a newspaper reporter in Washington, as the Asia correspondent based in Tokyo for World Monitor (the Monitor's nightly television program on the Discovery Cable Channel) and finally as senior Washington correspondent for Monitor Radio.

Barb was graduated magna cum laude from Williams College in 1981 with a degree in economics, and has a masters in legal studies from Yale Law School.

Law
4:55 pm
Wed January 11, 2012

Court Strikes Down Oklahoma Shariah Ban

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

A federal appeals court has struck down Oklahoma's ban on Sharia law. The ruling said the state amendment, which was passed in 2010, discriminated against Muslims.

NPR's Barbara Bradley Hagerty reports.

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Religion
7:47 pm
Wed November 10, 2010

Oklahoma's Anti-Shariah Law Put On Hold, For Now

Election board inspector Pat Cook places an "I Voted" sticker on a voter during early voting in Oklahoma City late last month.
Sue Ogrocki AP

A federal judge on Monday temporarily stopped Oklahoma's new anti-Shariah law from taking effect.

Oklahoma's law -- a ballot initiative approved by 70 percent of Oklahomans in the Nov. 2 elections -- would change the state constitution to prohibit courts from considering international or Muslim law when deciding cases.

Muneer Awad, head of the Oklahoma chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations, wasn't surprised at the Nov. 2 vote -- but he was sad and worried.

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Remembrances
6:27 am
Wed December 16, 2009

Oral Roberts, Pioneer Televangelist Dies

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, host:

Oral Roberts introduced a fiery Pentecostal style into mainstream Christianity. He tied his faith to his finances, creating a multimillion dollar empire. The 91-year-old Roberts died yesterday in Newport Beach, California of complications from pneumonia. He leaves behind a television legacy and a university that bears his name. NPR's Barbara Bradley Hagerty has this profile.

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