Amita Kelly

Amita Kelly manages national news coverage across NPR.org and other digital platforms.

Previously, she was a digital editor on NPR's Washington Desk, where she managed election, politics, and policy coverage for NPR.org as well as social media and audience engagement.

She was also an editor and producer for NPR's mid-day newsmagazine program Tell Me More, where she covered health, politics, parenting, and, once, how Korea celebrates St. Patrick's Day. Kelly has also worked at Kaiser Health News and NBC News.

Kelly was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Fellow at Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism, where she earned her M.A., and earned a B.A. in English from Wellesley College. She is a native of Southern California, where even Santa surfs.

In a "Carpool Karaoke" segment that will surely mortify her daughters, Michelle Obama drives around the White House grounds enthusiastically singing and dancing with Late Late Show host James Corden.

After an unconventional and then emotional opening day, the 2016 Republican National Convention will turn to Republican leadership and Donald Trump's children as it makes the case to "Make America Work Again."

Earlier in the day, around 5 p.m. ET, state delegates will formally nominate Trump and Gov. Mike Pence.

Following the shooting death of three law enforcement officers Sunday in Baton Rouge, presumptive Republican nominee Donald Trump blasted President Obama on Twitter and Facebook, saying he has "no clue" how to deal with a country that is a "divided crime scene."

Sunday's shooting follows a deadly officer shooting in Dallas and the death of Alton Sterling, a black man in Baton Rouge, earlier this month.

After weeks of speculation, presumptive GOP nominee Donald Trump tweeted Friday morning that he has chosen Indiana Gov. Mike Pence as his vice presidential running mate.

Trump had planned to hold a press conference Friday morning, but he canceled that after a deadly attack in France. He has now scheduled a news conference for Saturday at 11 a.m in New York City.

Pence quote-tweeted Trump's announcement, adding that he is "honored" to join the ticket and "work to make America great again."

Following last week's deadly shootings, South Carolina Sen. Tim Scott gave a deeply personal speech on the Senate floor in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday about the "deep divide" between communities and law enforcement.

While many law enforcement officers do good, he said, some do not. "I've experienced it myself."

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she disparaged him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb political statements" about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump on Friday morning condemned the shootings of Dallas law enforcement officers Thursday night as well as the deaths of two black men who were killed by police in the previous days.

In light of the events, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee also canceled his expected trip to Miami, where he had reportedly planned to meet with Hispanic leaders.

In his first response to the shootings this week, Trump called for restoring "law and order" and "confidence of our people to be safe and secure in their homes and on the street."

Updated at 8:40 p.m. ET

Vice President Joe Biden is confident that Bernie Sanders is going to endorse Hillary Clinton and that the Democratic party will unify.

"Oh, I've talked to Bernie, Bernie's going to endorse her, this is going to work out," Biden said in an interview with Rachel Martin, host of NPR's Weekend Edition. "The Democrats are coalescing even before this occurs."

Sanders was asked about Biden's comment in an interview with MSNBC on Thursday evening and said he wasn't quite ready to endorse Clinton.

Donald Trump had an awkward exchange Thursday at a New Hampshire event when a woman asked him why the U.S. isn't putting veterans on the border or at TSA instead of these "heebeejabis they wear at TSA." It was an apparent reference to Muslim employees who wear hijabs, or head coverings.

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