Allison Herrera

Allison Herrera was the co-creator of Invisible Nations, a project exploring modern Native culture in Oklahoma, from November 2015 to July 2016.

Herrera previously served as the editor of the award-winning online publication the Twin Cities Daily Planet. Since earning a B.A. from the Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington, she has worked as a radio and video producer for Twin Cities Public Television, AmpersKFAI, KSMQ, and several others.

She also has worked with KBFT radio on the Bois Forte Band of Chippewa reservation in northern Minnesota to produce a series of shows about art, culture, history and the environment.

Allison is working on a documentary about Ojibwe painter Jim Denomie and lives in Minneapolis with her daughter, Anna.

Ways to Connect

Allison Herrera

It’s one of the most controversial issues in Indian country, the issue of the Freedmen.

Cherokee Freedmen were former slaves adopted into the Cherokee tribe after the Trail of Tears. Today, descendants of the Freedmen say they've been denied citizenship and other rights owed to them. A federal judge is expected to rule on this issue sometime this year.

Allison Herrera

Cherokee basketmaker Shan Goshorn doesn’t head out into the woods gathering white oak or other natural materials for her work like traditional basketmakers would. Instead, the archives of museums like the Gilcrease Museum or the National Museum of the American Indian are her source materials.

Allison Herrera

Soldiers returning from battle face special challenges. Thousands suffer from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and their care can be more involved and long-term. The nation’s VA hospitals, although under recent scrutiny, will care for more than a million of the nation’s soldiers.

 

But, the nation’s Native American veterans face a set of extra challenges after fighting on the front lines.

 

Allison Herrera

Freedom of the press is something most journalists in the United States fiercely protect and demand. It’s seen as crucial to keeping those with power in check. But in Indian Country, it gets more complicated.

There are more than 200 tribal newspapers in the country and only a handful have passed freedom of the press acts. Editors have had stories cut, websites shut down and staff threatened or fired for publishing stories tribal officials don’t approve of.

Rachel Hubbard / KOSU

The Oklahoma Food Security Summit is a place where local community leaders, nutritionists and food producers gather to talk about what is going well in Oklahoma and what needs work.  This year, several tribal leaders and agricultural producers came to Tulsa to participate including the Choctaw Nation with their mobile Aquaponics Unit. 

KOSU is one of 15 stations chosen after a national competition to incubate storytelling experiments and expand public media to more Americans.

The winning teams were selected from more than 200 applications from independent media talent, radio and television stations, educators, and coders.

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