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World News
6:02 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

Boston bows out of Olympic bid, but Toronto may be in

Toronto may be looking to be the next city boasting the Olympic rings. 

Gary Hershorn/Reuters

Boston will not host the 2024 Summer Olympics.

The US Olympic Committe dropped Boston amidst concerns about the cost of building new infrastructure, transportation issues, and a lack of residential support. But that could open the door for a bid from another North American city, like Toronto.

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World News
6:02 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

A former Taliban prisoner remembers Mullah Omar

A US leaflet from 2002 with a picture of Mullah Omar offers a $5 million reward “for authentic information, that could lead to the arrest of Taliban, and al-Qaeda leaders.”

Reuters

The Afghan government says the Taliban leader, Mullah Omar, is dead. A statement said there was credible information that he died two years ago in Pakistan. A White House spokesman agreed that the reports were credible. There's been no word from the Taliban or from Pakistan.

The life of renowned Afghan author Qais Akbar Omar was directly affected by Mullah Omar and the Taliban.

Qais wrote the much-acclaimed autobiography "A Fort of Nine Towers: An Afghan Family Story," which culminates in his family's flight from war-torn Afghanistan.

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The Two-Way
5:50 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

SpaceShipTwo 'Pilot Was Thrown From The Vehicle' High In Atmosphere

A photo released by Virgin Galactic shows a badly injured SpaceShipTwo pilot Peter Siebold drifting under his parachute after last October's accident that destroyed the spacecraft during a test flight.
Mark Greenberg Virgin Galactic

The dramatic failure of a test flight by Virgin Galactic's SpaceShipTwo rocket last October cost the co-pilot his life and left the pilot severely injured. New data from investigators suggest that the pilot survived in part because the craft essentially came apart around him.

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Your Money
5:31 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

From The Silents To Millennials, Debt Burdens Span The Generations

Alyson Hurt and Paige Pfleger NPR

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 7:56 pm

For most of us, debt is a big part of life. According to a new study by Pew Charitable Trusts, 80 percent of Americans have some form of debt — from student loans to credit card balances.

There are many among the so-called silent generation, those born before World War II, who are still paying off mortgages and credit cards.

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The Salt
5:15 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

The Golden Age Of Cocktails: When Americans Learned To Love Mixed Drinks

An illustration from The Innocents Abroad by Mark Twain, published in 1897. Between the 1860s and 1920, when Prohibition went into effect, American bartending came into its own.
Internet Archive Book Images Flickr

Originally published on Thu July 30, 2015 9:54 am

Summertime is the perfect time to indulge in a refreshing cocktail on a balmy night. But before you reach for that minty mojito or sweet sangria, consider stepping out of your modern-day comfort zone and going back to the drinks of 100 years ago.

"Some of the best cocktails that we think about today — the martini, the daiquiri, the Manhattan — those all came out between the 1860s and Prohibition," says Derek Brown, an award-winning mixologist who has studied the history of alcohol in America.

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World News
5:12 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

Obama Administration Officials Take The 'Malign' Line On Iran

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 7:56 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Sports
5:12 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

After Boston Drops Olympic Bid, U.S. Committee Scrambles To Find New Choice

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 7:56 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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All Tech Considered
5:12 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

Politics Overshadows U.S. Tech Firms' Hopes For Entering Iran

Customers try out cellphones and tablets in a store in Tehran, in 2012. Financial sanctions make it difficult for U.S. firms to do business in Iran, analysts say.
Vahid Salemi AP

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 7:56 pm

Iran has the potential to be a boom market for American tech companies. The majority of the population is under 30 and well educated, and over half the country has access to the Internet.

Many businesses have to wait until more sanctions are lifted, but certain tech companies can already go into Iran legally because the U.S. has lifted sanctions on various communication technology. They just aren't sure they want to.

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Environment
5:12 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

California's Drought Spurs Unexpected Effect: Eco-Friendly Development

A town in California's Central Valley plans to transform farmland into an eco-friendly residential community. An artist's rendering shows plans for Kings River Village in Reedley, Calif.
Courtesy of the City of Reedley

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 7:56 pm

The drought in California has gone on so long, and is so severe, that it's beginning to change the way people are designing residential communities — in unexpected ways, and unexpected places.

Planning is under way, for instance, for one of the first eco-friendly communities in California's predominantly agricultural Central Valley.

The site is in the town of Reedley, 30 miles southeast of Fresno.

There were a number of factors that distinguished Reedley, says Curt Johansen, the San Francisco developer who's spearheading the project.

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Code Switch
5:12 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

Once Outlaws, Young Lords Find A Museum Home For Radical Roots

Johanna Fernández, co-curator of a new exhibition about the Young Lords, points to pages of the group's newspaper on display at the Bronx Museum of the Arts.
Hansi Lo Wang NPR

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 7:56 pm

They were under watch by the FBI and the New York Police Department. And by the early 1970s, the Young Lords emerged as one of the country's most prominent radical groups led by Latino activists.

Inspired by the Black Panthers, a band of young Puerto Ricans wanted to form a Latino counterpart to the black nationalist group. In fact, one of the founding Young Lords in New York City almost started a group called the "Brown Tigers."

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