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Andres Martinez Casares/Reuters

This week, nearly 60,000 immigrants awaited a Department of Homeland Security decision that would either allow them to stay in the US or end their temporary legal status. 

After a period of anxiety, this week DHS announced the status would be extended.

The temporary protected status (TPS) program allows immigrants from countries in crisis to live and work in the US legally. Haitians were initially granted TPS in 2010, when the island was hit by a massive earthquake.

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Jonathan Ernst/Reuters/TPX Images of the Day 

From the moment Air Force One touched down on the runway at Israel’s Ben Gurion Airport, President Donald Trump and his wife Melania, as well as their hosts, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and his wife Sara, provided Israelis with seemingly endless opportunities for giggles, laughs and snark.

For most leaders, and in most countries, red carpet affairs are fairly staid and uneventful, following set protocols. But to state the obvious, neither Trump nor Israel's leaders are like most.

Now here's a picture Trump probably wants to go viral

15 hours ago
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Jonathan Ernst/Reuters

The photos from President Donald Trump's overseas trip have been the gift that keeps on giving.

Take this shot of Trump, his wife Melania and daughter Ivanka standing next to Pope Francis at the Vatican. Trump looks stoked. The pope looks like someone stole his ice cream cone. 

In Mexico, the race is on to save a small, gray porpoise that is on the brink of extinction. It's called the vaquita, which is Spanish for "small cow."

Scientists believe only 30 remain in the warm, shallow waters of the Gulf of California, between Baja California's peninsula and mainland Mexico — the only place they live in the world.

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REUTERS/Jose Cabezas

Ana Riva was at work one day in 2015 when she got an urgent call from her 16-year-old nephew, Juan. It was a moment that she had always feared would come, since she took over raising Juan after his mother left for the US.

 

Now, here it was. A local gang had him surrounded, insisting he join.

"They demanded money when they threatened him. They wanted him to pay them a sum of money immediately," says Riva. "He called me totally scared. I mean, they had guns to his head."

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Neil Hall/Reuters

The suspect in the Manchester bombing, Salman Abedi, wasn’t unknown to UK counterterrorism officials. In fact, members of the Libyan community where Abedi lived had reported him before, worried about some of the views he was expressing.

That kind of keeping an eye out, as a community, is exactly what the “Countering Violent Extremism” program wants to encourage in the US.

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Many of us learned about the Manchester attack by looking at our phones. We got news alerts, saw videos posted to Facebook and tweets on Twitter. Perhaps you even sent a few of your own. But that might not be the best thing to do.

The Air Force says it will investigate an incident in which an employee at the Dover Air Force Base mortuary allegedly offered to show John Glenn's remains to Defense Department inspectors.

As part of a new policy, an inspection team completed a weeklong review of the mortuary at Dover in March.

During the inspection, according to an Air Force spokesman, "someone reportedly offered to show the remains of Sen. John Glenn to DoD inspectors."

Everything President Trump has done in office, apart from international affairs and foreign policy, has been a "complete disaster," says former House Speaker John Boehner.

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