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World News
6:29 pm
Tue March 3, 2015

Why some Muslim women in the West are trying to pass as non-Muslims

Usra Ghazi and Thanaa El-Naggar discuss issues that divide some women in the Muslim community. El-Naggar is viewed in a sketch since she isn't comfortable attaching a photo to views some might consider controversial.

Marco Werman. Sketch courtesy of Thanaa El-Naggar

When author Thanaa El-Naggar penned an essay for Gawker's True Stories last week, she says she didn't think her words would reverberate far beyond her immediate circle of friends. She was wrong. 

"It would be difficult to tell you who I know who hasn't read this piece," says Usra Ghazi, a research assistant with the Islam in the West Program at Harvard University.

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Politics
6:25 pm
Tue March 3, 2015

House Passes No-Strings-Attached Bill To Fund Homeland Security

An effort by some congressional Republicans to block President Obama's executive actions on immigration by tying it to a Homeland Security spending bill officially failed on Tuesday. House Speaker John Boehner yet again bucked the most conservative wing of his party and brought a "clean" funding bill to the floor. It passed easily, thanks to unanimous backing by Democrats.

World News
6:09 pm
Tue March 3, 2015

Netanyahu punctuates speech to Congress with American pop culture and flattery

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu knows how to appeal to his American audience: Lace your speech with references to American pop culture and compliment your hosts, even those you've upset just by showing up.

Netanyahu was invited by Republican House Speaker John Boehner to address a joint meeting of Congress — without consulting President Barack Obama. That's creating a rift with the White House, which has been negotiating a nuclear deal with Iran. 

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Law
5:59 pm
Tue March 3, 2015

Round 2: Health Care Law Faces The Supreme Court Again

Supporters of the Affordable Care Act celebrate outside the Supreme Court in 2012, after a divided court upheld the law as constitutional by a 5-to-4 vote. The latest battle, which the Supreme Court hears Wednesday, is over whether people who buy insurance through federally run exchanges are eligible for subsidies.
David Goldman AP

Originally published on Tue March 3, 2015 6:54 pm

Round 2 in the legal battle over Obamacare hits the Supreme Court's intellectual boxing ring Wednesday.

In one corner is the Obama administration, backed by the nation's hospitals, insurance companies, physician associations and other groups like Catholic Charities and the American Cancer Society.

In the other corner are conservative groups, backed by politicians who fought in Congress to prevent the bill from being adopted.

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World News
5:52 pm
Tue March 3, 2015

Have archaeologists discovered the 'Lost City of the Monkey God?'

One of the artifacts found at the base of a pyramid at the archealogical site. It’s suggested it could be the effigy of a "were-jaguar," part of a still-buried ceremonial seat, or "metate."

Doug Yoder/National Geographic

Archaeologists have just completed the first ground exploration of the ruins of a previously unknown city deep in the tropical rainforest of Honduras.

“The team was led to the remote, uninhabited region by long-standing rumors that it was the site of a storied ‘White City,’ also referred to in legend as the ‘City of the Monkey God,'" according to National Geographic, which first reported the story on Monday and furnished these amazing photos.

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World News
5:43 pm
Tue March 3, 2015

American Jews have mixed feelings about Benjamin Netanyahu's speech

If you put five Jews in a room, the old joke goes, you get six opinions. So it's no shock that Benjamin Netanyahu's speech to Congress has strongly divided opinions among Jews living in the United States.

"There is a division," says Alan Lowenthal, a Democratic congressman from California. "I think that it's unfortunate that all of us who were one time on the same page were forced to make choices."

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The Two-Way
5:26 pm
Tue March 3, 2015

Should Hotel Owners Be Forced To Hand Over Guest Records To Police?

When lawyer Thomas Goldstein contended that innkeepers keep guest information anyway to stay in touch with their customers, Justice Scalia cut in: "Motel 6 does this? Jeez, I've never received anything from them!"
iStockPhoto

Originally published on Tue March 3, 2015 7:10 pm

Hypotheticals about hunting lodges and Motel 6 saved the oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court Tuesday from being strangled by legal weeds.

At issue was a Los Angeles ordinance that requires hotel and motel owners to record various pieces of information about their guests — drivers license, credit card and automobile tags, for instance. The hotel owners don't dispute they have to do that; what they do dispute is the part of the law that requires proprietors to make this information available to any member of the Los Angeles Police Department upon demand.

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Parallels
5:24 pm
Tue March 3, 2015

In France, Young Muslims Often Straddle Two Worlds

Ismael Medjdoub grew up in one of Paris' banlieues. He spends up to two hours a day commuting from his home in Tremblay en France to work and to school at the prestigious Sorbonne in Paris.
Bilal Qureshi NPR

Originally published on Tue March 3, 2015 8:37 pm

The French, with their national motto of "liberty, equality, fraternity," are so against religious and ethnic divisions that the government doesn't even collect this kind of data on its citizens, but it's believed that nearly 40 percent of the country's 7 million Muslims live in and around Paris.

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Law
5:23 pm
Tue March 3, 2015

Ferguson Political Leader: DOJ Report Validates Protesters

Originally published on Tue March 3, 2015 6:25 pm

The Justice Department is set to release a report that condemns the Ferguson, Mo., Police Department for its discriminatory practices. NPR's Melissa Block speaks with local political leader Patricia Bynes about the report and its implications.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Remembrances
5:23 pm
Tue March 3, 2015

'Minnie Monoso,' First Black Latin Professional Baseball Player, Dies

Originally published on Tue March 3, 2015 6:21 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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