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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

When the Jellineks’ 20-year-old son moved out of the house, a 28-year-old refugee from Syria moved in.

“The room was free,” says Chaim Jellinek, a Berlin doctor. “And we said, ‘OK, we try.’”

Germany has taken in hundreds of thousands of Syrian war refugees over the past year. Some Germans hosted refugees in their homes.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Miguel Gutierrez Jr. 

High school graduation can be a milestone for many first-generation college students and their families.

As part of our Global Nation reporting on education, KUT's Kate McGee met with students who participated in Breakthrough Austin, a non-profit that supports first-generation students to get their high school degree. 

KUT GNe

Breakthrough Austin

Brexiteer to Brussels: 'You're not laughing now, are you?'

6 hours ago

The European Union faces an existential crisis, but the first order of business in Brussels on Tuesday was a debate on regulations governing weed killer in the 28-nation club.

Some say that’s typical of the European project. Excessive regulation, and poor priorities.

And yet the future of Europe is on the line after Britain voted to leave the EU last week.

On Tuesday, British and European leaders gathered in Brussels to try to pick up the pieces.

One summer day in 2012, on a long drive through northern Mozambique, I saw groups of men standing beside the road selling buckets filled with sweet potatoes. My translator and I pulled over to take a closer look. Many of the sweet potatoes, as I'd hoped, were orange inside. In fact, the men had cut off the tips of each root to show off that orange color. It was a selling point.

This summer, it's not just athletes who are looking to set world records. Scientists are also trying to break a record — for how quickly they can make a vaccine for a new virus.

It's for Zika. And one team is leading the pack.

As the water recedes in West Virginia, residents are taking stock of their losses. At least 23 people died in massive floods that swept across the southeastern part of the state on Friday.

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