Woodward County, Oklahoma, is one of the most climate-skeptical counties in the United States, according to estimates from the Yale Project on Climate Communication. 

The uproar over sting videos alleging Planned Parenthood illegally profits from selling aborted fetal tissue has only just begun on Capitol Hill.

Emily Wendler / KOSU

Monday was the first day back in the classroom for the Oklahoma City Public School district. It was also a new beginning for 14 Puerto Rican teachers that the district recruited because of the lack of teachers in the state. 

Odaliz Soto, one of the district's recruits, said she felt like she was already breaking down language barriers on her first day. 

Her kindergartners at Parmelee Elementary are mostly Hispanic, and speak very little English. So, Soto says everything twice.

Headlines for Tuesday, August 4, 2015:

An epic legal battle is about to begin over President Obama's plan to address climate change, in which the Environmental Protection Agency is putting in place new limits on greenhouse gases from power plants. Critics argue the plan is on shaky legal ground, but the administration says it's prepared to defend the regulations in court.

In announcing the "Clean Power Plan" on Monday, Obama predicted some of the arguments his critics would make.

The Changing Look of Our Heroes

Aug 4, 2015

Every generation has its share of heroes and idols in popular culture.

Over the decades they’ve changed for good or ill.

Jennifer Dennis-Smith looks at how we now see those we admire in this week’s Jen X.

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma oil and gas authorities on Monday ordered the operators of 23 disposal wells in two counties to reduce the amount of wastewater pumped underground.

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Monday finalized its Clean Power Plan, the Obama Administration’s attempt to cut carbon emissions from power plants by more than 30 percent nationwide.

Though just finalized, the plan has been in the works for two years, and Oklahoma officials have opposed it every step of the way.

Updated at 2:30 p.m. ET

President Obama formally unveiled his plan to cut power plant emissions — some two years in the making — calling it the "single most important step that America has ever made in the fight against global climate change."


Education reporter Emily Wendler spoke with the Superintendent of Public Instruction, Joy Hofmeister, about some of the more pressing issues in Oklahoma education.

At the top of the list was the teacher shortage, the new academic standards, and the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act in Washington. 

The ESEA was last reauthorized in 2002 by then President George W. Bush, who renamed it the No Child Left Behind Act. This law was meant to make sure low-income students got the same education as everyone else. It implemented mandatory testing and rated schools and teachers based on those testing results. This has been a contentious issue for many educators across the nation—including Superintendent Hofmeister.