Sports news

Heading the ball in soccer has been accused of causing most concussions. But the hazard may be more due to rough play than to one particular technique, researchers say.

The risks involved in heading — when a player uses their head to keep the ball in play — are not new. But Dawn Comstock, an injury epidemiologist at the University of Colorado's School of Public Health, wanted to know if headers are indeed the chief cause of concussions.

Updated at 2:10 p.m. ET

Serena Williams won her 21st Grand Slam title in a Wimbledon final against a much younger opponent, 21-year-old Garbine Muguruza of Spain.

For Williams, 33, it was her fourth Grand Slam championship in a row and her 25th career Grand Slam title match. It was Muguruza's first. Williams beat Muguruza 6-4, 6-4.

"Yeah, I'm having so much fun out here, you know, I just never dreamt I would be out here still and let alone winning," Williams told the crowd at Wimbledon after accepting her trophy.

Nick Wass / AP

A federal court has ruled against Washington, D.C.'s, professional football team in a legal battle with Native Americans over the team's name.

United States District Judge Gerald Bruce Lee ruled that the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office should cancel the team's trademark of the Redskins name because the name "may disparage" Native Americans.

This order does not go into effect until the team has exhausted its appeals. The next step for the team would be the United States Supreme Court.

Saying that Floyd Mayweather missed a deadline to pay a fee related to his May 2 win over Manny Pacquiao, the World Boxing Organization has stripped Floyd of the welterweight title he won in that fight.

The U.S. women's national team is basking in the glow of the new FIFA World Cup trophy they claimed with an emphatic 5-2 win over Japan on Sunday. Led by Carli Lloyd's three first-half goals, the win touched off celebrations and drew a huge TV audience, according to Fox.

The U.S. team won the Women's World Cup soccer final 5-2 in a game that brought U.S. fans to their feet, reduced polished sportswriters to all-caps expressions of awe and rewrote FIFA records — and that was just in the first half.

The game began in spectacular fashion: In the first five minutes, captain Carli Lloyd scored two swift goals — the fastest two goals in FIFA history, according to the FIFA Women's World Cup Twitter account.

Just a few minutes later, Lauren Holiday brought the score up to 3-0.

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A 2-0 win over Germany on Tuesday night gave the U.S. a place in the Women's World Cup final.

You can construct a lot of hero narratives around last night's game: The American defense is unstoppable. (Julie Johnston has been a breakout player.) Midfielder Carli Lloyd owns the field.

Walk into a bar or spend some time in an airport and there's a good chance ESPN is on TV. What happens on its ever-present SportsCenter, airing live 18 times daily, resonates with sports fans around the country. So it matters that over the past couple of years, ESPN has increased coverage of what's always been an extremely sensitive topic for leagues and TV networks — sports betting.

ESPN says it wants to be more direct about a topic broadcasters have dealt with circuitously, often with a wink and nod, rather than in the direct language of gambling.

In what Major League Baseball says is a first, French baseball player Melissa Mayeux has had her name added to the list of international prospects who could be signed by clubs on July 2.

At age 16, Mayeux plays shortstop for two of France's national teams: the U-18 junior squad and the senior softball team. She's known as a smooth fielder who can also handle a bat.