Arts & Culture

Arts and culture

When Fear the Walking Dead premiers Sunday night on AMC, don't expect to see Sheriff Grimes. There's no Daryl, either. In fact, the streets aren't even overrun yet with those dirty, hungry hoards of the undead that viewers know so well.

Still, something weird is happening — and it's happening in LA, not Atlanta, this time around. Fear, a prequel to the hit show The Walking Dead, swaps the post-apocalyptic Deep South for the West Coast, where that apocalypse still has yet to happen (or is just getting underway).

Yvonne Craig, best known for her role as Batgirl in the iconic 1960s television series Batman, died Monday. She was 78.

As part of a series called My Big Break, All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

Before donning polka dots, pencil skirts, plaid and stylish retro hairstyles on Mad Men, Alison Brie was sporting a far less glamorous look.

She worked the children's birthday party circuit as a clown.

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Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Eighty years ago today, the most famous man in America besides Franklin D. Roosevelt died, and in 1935, I'm not sure you needed to add a "besides."

Will Rogers was 55. He was flying through Alaska with his friend, the pilot Wiley Post, to mine some material for his newspaper column and radio show when they crashed near Point Barrow.

Known for adult dramas and gory thrillers, HBO is home to some of the most colorful characters on television, but this fall another brightly colored crew is joining the network.

Sesame Workshop, the nonprofit behind the beloved children's show, announced a new deal with HBO Thursday that will bring the next five seasons of Sesame Street to the premium cable channel and its streaming services.

But Sesame Street isn't vacating its old neighborhood, NPR's Neda Ulaby reports. She tells our Newscast unit that:

If you thought that professional video game competitions would be the one sport immune to a doping scandal, you'd be wrong.

Stephen Colbert met with TV critics in Los Angeles this week, about one month before he’s due to succeed David Letterman as host of the CBS “Late Show.” And the comic, known for playing a parody of a right wing talk show host on Comedy Central's “Colbert Report,” had an interesting tidbit to share about what he'll be like on the Late Show's on Sept. 8.

NPR TV critic Eric Deggans joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to discuss Colbert’s new gig.

Guest

As part of a series called My Big Break, All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

After 16 years of honing a unique brand of political satire that has been much copied, but rarely equaled, Jon Stewart signed off for his final episode of The Daily Show with a list of guests who either helped create the jokes or were on the receiving end of them over the years.

"Guess what?" Stewart opened. "I've got big news. This is it."

The 52-year-old comic announced last winter that he would be stepping down from the Comedy Central powerhouse, with Trevor Noah set to take over the hosting duties.

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