Quinton Chandler / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma Officials Endorse Nitrogen Executions As 'Humane,' But Some Medical Experts Aren't Sure

Oklahoma wants to go where no state has gone before: Executing death row inmates with nitrogen gas. Officials say nitrogen will bring quick, painless deaths, but the research is slim — and it has never been used in U.S. executions. The case for nitrogen hypoxia sounds simple. Nitrogen is already in the air we breathe, but, as long as humans get the right mix, nitrogen is safe. The state wants to make death row inmates breathe pure nitrogen. State Sen. Ervin Yen, R-Oklahoma City, is a cardiac...

Read More

'I Just Want To Know That You'll Be Okay': A Father And Son's Evolving Relationship

The StoryCorps mobile booth was in Oklahoma City in early 2018, and we're bringing you some of the stories that were recorded here. Locally recorded stories will air Wednesdays during Morning Edition and All Things Considered on KOSU. Relationships with parents often change in adulthood. Jeff and Blaze McKenzie, father and son, visited the StoryCorps mobile booth in Oklahoma City and reflected on their evolving relationship. This story was produced for KOSU by Rachel Hubbard and Dustin Drew,...

Read More

Win VIP Passes to Norman Music Festival

Enter before midnight on Sunday, April 22, 2018 to win two VIP passes to see Tune-Yards, Parquet Courts, Japanese Breakfast, Chastity Belt, and 300 other bands at Norman Music Festival ! VIP holders get access to the front of the main stage, access to a VIP hospitality area with food and drink, a private bathroom, and NMF merchandise. Winners will be notified by email within a few days after the entry window closes. Official KOSU giveaway rules can be found here . Good luck! Loading...

Read More
Ryan LaCroix / KOSU

Dozens of schools across the state are closed for the seventh day, as thousands of Oklahoma teachers, students and education supporters are expected to descend on the state capitol today.

Warmer weather brought more demonstrators on Monday than the previous week, although the fight over education funding seems to be at a stalemate.

Photo Provided

The McKnight Center for the Performing Arts at Oklahoma State University in Stillwater is still more than a year away from holding its grand opening concert. But as construction continues on the new state-of-the-art music performance venue, the first series of performances is already underway in Oklahoma City, Tulsa and Stillwater.

Flickr / unitedsoybean

As the United States and China propose tariffs on one another, possibly leading to a trade war, one Oklahoma grain specialist is urging Oklahoma agricultural producers to stay focused on the long-term.

For days, the Washington world waited for the presidential tweet that would end the troubled tenure of Scott Pruitt, the high-profile and high-maintenance administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

It was hard to imagine anyone surviving an onslaught of stories like those recounting Pruitt's living large on several continents — with eye-popping costs for travel and security.

Updated at 8:15 p.m. ET

President Trump unloaded on both Justice Department special counsel Robert Mueller and Attorney General Jeff Sessions, hours after federal agents raided the office of Trump's longtime personal attorney Michael Cohen.

"It's a disgraceful situation. It's a total witch hunt," Trump said on Monday. "When I saw this, when I heard about it, that is a whole new level of unfairness."

Teachers in Oklahoma are in the sixth day of their walkout Monday, as they fight to get increased state education funding. Lawmakers there have already passed a few measures to increase funding and give teachers a salary bump, but educators say they haven't gone far enough.

Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson talks with Sharon Reese, a special education teacher at Shawnee High School in Shawnee, Oklahoma.

This segment aired on April 9, 2018.

The Oklahoma State Election Board is heading into this week's candidate filing period with the possibility of thousands of teachers, students and education supporters still rallying at the Capitol.

In preparation of the crowds, officials are moving the filing location from the second floor of the capitol down to just inside the west entrance on the ground level, in order to avoid crowds possibly still packed in the area.

Jacob McCleland / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

Updated 2:09 p.m.

It's day six of the Oklahoma teacher walkout and some students miss being in school. Administrators at Wilson Elementary in Oklahoma City arranged a play date so kids could see their friends and their teachers. StateImpact’s Emily Wendler was there.

Updated 10:05 a.m.

Pages

Education News

Jacob McCleland / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

After nine days of rallying at the state capitol, union leaders say the Oklahoma teacher walkout is over.

The president of the Oklahoma Education Association, Alicia Priest, said on Thursday that despite thousands of people calling on lawmakers to increase school funding, educators have seen no significant legislative movement since last Friday.

She said the union polled its members, and a majority doubted that continuing the walkout would result in more money for schools.

Emily Wendler / StateImpact Oklahoma

Updated 5:09 p.m.

The state's largest teachers union have announced the Oklahoma teacher walkout is over.

In a press conference this afternoon, Oklahoma Education Association president Alicia Priest said some schools and teachers may continue to walk, but that is up to them and their school boards.

Priest declared the walkout a victory, saying teachers had secured an additional half a billion dollars for public education, but Senate leaders refused to do more this year, and that was the reason for calling things off.

When Evan Taylor heard that Oklahoma teachers planned to walkout, he converted his small Tulsa church into a "glorified daycare" furnished with board games, crafts and a movies to keep kids entertained.

More Education News
KOSU's Michael Cross talks about political news in Oklahoma with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican political consultant Neva Hill.

The Spy plays independent, local, and alternative music and features more than 20 unique specialty shows.
A weekly two-hour show of Oklahoma music, from across the state. The show opens a window of Oklahoma music to the rest of the world.

Weeknights with Ferris

Hear Ferris O'Brien every weeknight, from 7 p.m. to midnight, on The Spy.