Here & Now
3:23 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

University Of Oklahoma's New Diversity Chief: 'We Can Do Better'

Tape with the word "UNHEARD" covers the mouth of the sculpture "The Sower" at the University of Oklahoma on March 11, 2015 in Norman, Oklahoma. The statue was marked by the black student group OU UNHEARD at the university. (Brett Deering/Getty Images)

Originally published on Mon April 20, 2015 3:23 pm

The University of Oklahoma’s first chief diversity officer starts his new job soon, three months after the university kicked out a fraternity and expelled two students who were seen on video leading a racist chant.

University president David Boren was praised for acting swiftly once the video was made public last month. But the University of Oklahoma is one of only four schools in the Big 12 Conference without a chief diversity officer.

Some minority students at the university are asking, what took the university president so long to hire one?

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Headlines
8:02 am
Mon April 20, 2015

Headlines: Remembering Tragedy, Stillwater Drilling & Broke GOP

Headlines for Monday, April 20, 2015:

  • Reflections on an April morning 20 years ago. (NewsOK)
     
  • New records raise questions over a gun used by a reserve deputy in a fatal shooting earlier this month. (Tulsa World)

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NPR Ed
5:01 am
Mon April 20, 2015

Anti-Test 'Opt-Out' Movement Makes A Wave In New York State

A school bus passes a sign encouraging parents to have their children opt out of state tests in Rotterdam, N.Y.
Mike Groll AP

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 9:25 am

Across New York state this week, some students are refusing to take a test, and they're not getting punished for it. The test is a Common Core-aligned, federally mandated exam, and students, parents and educators are part of what they're calling the opt-out movement.

Opt-outs made news last week in several states: Colorado, Florida, Oregon, Maine, Michigan, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, to name a few. The objections are similar everywhere. But no state is posting numbers like New York.

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All Tech Considered
5:01 am
Mon April 20, 2015

Social Media Can Help Track Tornadoes, But Was That Tweet Real?

Purdue University students are testing new software that may track and warn about tornadoes, such as this one which struck Rochelle, Ill., in early April.
Walker Ashley AP

Originally published on Mon April 20, 2015 7:49 am

Last week, as a big storm bore down on Rockford, Ill., students in a Purdue University classroom prepared to track its effects using Twitter.

Using software jointly developed by Purdue, the Department of Homeland Security and the National Weather Service, they huddled around laptops to analyze a tiny sample of the tweets from the storm's immediate vicinity. They were looking for keywords like "damage" or "tornado" and for pictures of funnel clouds.

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Environment
3:47 am
Mon April 20, 2015

5 Years After BP Oil Spill, Effects Linger And Recovery Is Slow

Pelicans are nesting at Queen Bess Island in Barataria Bay. Five years ago, the nesting season here was marred by the oil gushing out of the Deepwater Horizon disaster.
Debbie Elliott NPR

Originally published on Tue April 21, 2015 7:04 pm

Five years ago, BP's out-of-control oil well deep in the Gulf of Mexico exploded. Eleven workers were killed on the Deepwater Horizon rig. But it was more than a deadly accident — the blast unleashed the nation's worst offshore environmental catastrophe.

In the spring and summer of 2010, oil gushed from the Macondo well for nearly three months. More than 3 million barrels of Louisiana light crude fouled beaches and wetlands from Texas to Florida, affecting wildlife and livelihoods.

Today, the spill's impacts linger.

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The Two-Way
12:49 pm
Sun April 19, 2015

2 Decades Later, 168 Victims Of Oklahoma City Attack Are Remembered

Spectators bow their heads during a moment of silence during a ceremony to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the Oklahoma City bombing at the Oklahoma City National Memorial, on Sunday.
Sue Ogrocki AP

Originally published on Sun April 19, 2015 4:50 pm

Twenty years ago today, Timothy McVeigh — an Army veteran with strong anti-government views — drove a rental truck containing a massive homemade bomb up to the front of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, lit the fuse and walked away.

The result was the worst act of domestic terrorism in U.S. history. It took the lives of 168 people, including many children attending a daycare in the targeted building.

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OKC Bombing: 20 Years Later
7:47 am
Sun April 19, 2015

Remembering The Day The Murrah Building Was Bombed

Originally published on Sun April 19, 2015 11:00 am

Copyright 2015 WBUR. To see more, visit http://www.wbur.org.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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The Two-Way
5:57 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Oklahoma Approves Nitrogen Asphyxiation For Executions

Originally published on Sat April 18, 2015 1:02 pm

Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin signed a law today allowing nitrogen to be used in executions in the state in case lethal injection is ruled unconstitutional or the drugs are not available.

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OKC Bombing: 20 Years Later
5:12 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Oklahoma City Bombing A 'Wake-Up Call' For Government Security

The Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building was "literally right up against the road so it was extremely vulnerable," said architect Barbara Nadel. One of the government's first responses was to close a two-block stretch of Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the White House.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat April 18, 2015 1:22 pm

Twenty years ago this Sunday, a truck bomb exploded next to the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City. One hundred sixty-eight people were killed in the blast, hundreds were injured.

The bombing prompted heightened security at federal buildings — around the nation, and especially here in Washington.

One of the government's first responses to the bombing was closing a two-block stretch of Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the White House.

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OKC Bombing: 20 Years Later
12:03 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

That April Morning: The Oklahoma City Bombing

The Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

The bomb that destroyed the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in downtown Oklahoma City killed 168 people - including 19 children. It injured hundreds more, and forever shaped the community.

April 19, 1995 started as an idyllic spring morning - clear skies, calm winds - better than most Wednesdays during the state’s usually-turbulent severe weather season. Nothing seemed out of the ordinary. Workers showed up to their jobs, and went about their regular routines.

That all changed at 9:02 a.m.

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