Quinton Chandler / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma Officials Endorse Nitrogen Executions As 'Humane,' But Some Medical Experts Aren't Sure

Oklahoma wants to go where no state has gone before: Executing death row inmates with nitrogen gas. Officials say nitrogen will bring quick, painless deaths, but the research is slim — and it has never been used in U.S. executions. The case for nitrogen hypoxia sounds simple. Nitrogen is already in the air we breathe, but, as long as humans get the right mix, nitrogen is safe. The state wants to make death row inmates breathe pure nitrogen. State Sen. Ervin Yen, R-Oklahoma City, is a cardiac...

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'I Just Want To Know That You'll Be Okay': A Father And Son's Evolving Relationship

The StoryCorps mobile booth was in Oklahoma City in early 2018, and we're bringing you some of the stories that were recorded here. Locally recorded stories will air Wednesdays during Morning Edition and All Things Considered on KOSU. Relationships with parents often change in adulthood. Jeff and Blaze McKenzie, father and son, visited the StoryCorps mobile booth in Oklahoma City and reflected on their evolving relationship. This story was produced for KOSU by Rachel Hubbard and Dustin Drew,...

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Win VIP Passes to Norman Music Festival

Enter before midnight on Sunday, April 22, 2018 to win two VIP passes to see Tune-Yards, Parquet Courts, Japanese Breakfast, Chastity Belt, and 300 other bands at Norman Music Festival ! VIP holders get access to the front of the main stage, access to a VIP hospitality area with food and drink, a private bathroom, and NMF merchandise. Winners will be notified by email within a few days after the entry window closes. Official KOSU giveaway rules can be found here . Good luck! Loading...

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Teachers in Arizona are staging what they're calling a walk-in today. They're asking lawmakers for a 20 percent pay raise and for school funding to return to pre-recession levels. This comes as teachers in Oklahoma continue their walk-out. After more than a week of protests and dozens of closed schools across the state, Oklahoma lawmakers have already agreed to increase teacher pay and school funding.

Updated at 3:08 p.m. ET

After five hours of testimony before a joint session of two Senate committees on Tuesday, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg returned to the Capitol for a second straight day of grilling — this time before the House.

Headlines for Wednesday, April 11, 2018:

When Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testified before a joint Senate Committee on Wednesday, he led off with a mea culpa. Just a few paragraphs into his opening statement, he took personal responsibility for the disinformation:

Updated at 1:09 p.m. ET

President Trump had a ready retort to a Russian threat to shoot down any U.S. missiles in Syria: "Get ready Russia, because they will be coming, nice and new and 'smart!' "

Trump tweeted that news early Wednesday and added, "You shouldn't be partners with a Gas Killing Animal who kills his people and enjoys it!"

Emily Wendler / StateImpact Oklahoma

As Oklahoma's teacher walkout enters its eighth day, the union leading it has a new demand to end it.

Oklahoma Education Association is now saying lawmakers just need to raise another $50 million in revenue for the state budget, and they'll send educators back to school.

Katherine Bishop, OEA Vice President, says it's up to lawmakers to find the money. She doesn't care whether it comes from a wind tax or a repeal of the capital gains exemption, she just wants to see the legislature raise another $50 million to shore up the state budget.

The StoryCorps mobile booth was in Oklahoma City in early 2018, and we're bringing you some of the stories that were recorded here. Locally recorded stories will air Wednesdays during Morning Edition and All Things Considered on KOSU.

There are points in life that can force or inspire a change of course. Even though he’s a spunky and scrappy 9-year-old today, when Jason and Vanessa Hart heard that their son had cancer...in an instant, everything changed.

City of Oklahoma City

For the first time in 14 years, Oklahoma City has a new mayor.

On Tuesday morning, former state senator David Holt was sworn into office before his first city council meeting.

An Oklahoma City native, Holt is the 36th mayor and is also the first Native American to hold the title. At age 39, he’s also the youngest American leader of a city with more than 500,000 residents.

The ongoing teacher walkout could start hurting Oklahoma’s blood supply.

The Oklahoma Blood Institute says the supply is currently stable, but that could change if the teacher walkout and subsequent school closings go on much longer.

Marketing and Media Manager Heather Browne says there are several reasons for a lack of donations right now.

“People are not able to come in because they’re busy with kids that are home, and, also, schools make up 20% of our blood collections, so some of those drives are having to be rescheduled or have been canceled."

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Education News

Jacob McCleland / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

After nine days of rallying at the state capitol, union leaders say the Oklahoma teacher walkout is over.

The president of the Oklahoma Education Association, Alicia Priest, said on Thursday that despite thousands of people calling on lawmakers to increase school funding, educators have seen no significant legislative movement since last Friday.

She said the union polled its members, and a majority doubted that continuing the walkout would result in more money for schools.

Emily Wendler / StateImpact Oklahoma

Updated 5:09 p.m.

The state's largest teachers union have announced the Oklahoma teacher walkout is over.

In a press conference this afternoon, Oklahoma Education Association president Alicia Priest said some schools and teachers may continue to walk, but that is up to them and their school boards.

Priest declared the walkout a victory, saying teachers had secured an additional half a billion dollars for public education, but Senate leaders refused to do more this year, and that was the reason for calling things off.

When Evan Taylor heard that Oklahoma teachers planned to walkout, he converted his small Tulsa church into a "glorified daycare" furnished with board games, crafts and a movies to keep kids entertained.

More Education News
KOSU's Michael Cross talks about political news in Oklahoma with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican political consultant Neva Hill.

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