Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Senate Confirms Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt as Nation's Top Environmental Watchdog

The U.S. Senate on Friday confirmed Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt as administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, a federal regulatory agency the Oklahoma politician has built his brand fighting against. Pruitt has led a coordinated legal effort to fight the EPA through the courts, an alliance with other Republican attorneys general that’s made him popular among conservatives. The confirmation sends a strong signal that Congressional Republicans share with President Donald...

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In Oklahoma, a new law requires any woman seeking an abortion to first answer dozens of personal questions, including why she wants the procedure. That information, names omitted, would eventually be posted on a state Web site.

Those who support the measure say it will help them better understand why women are seeking abortions. Abortion rights advocates call the law intimidating and invasive, and this week, they are challenging it in court. Legal experts say the law is another test of how far states can go to regulate abortion.

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ARI SHAPIRO, host:

Oral Roberts introduced a fiery Pentecostal style into mainstream Christianity. He tied his faith to his finances, creating a multimillion dollar empire. The 91-year-old Roberts died yesterday in Newport Beach, California of complications from pneumonia. He leaves behind a television legacy and a university that bears his name. NPR's Barbara Bradley Hagerty has this profile.

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MELISSA BLOCK, host:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, host:

I'm Robert Siegel.

And now, we mark the passing of a pioneering televangelist. Oral Roberts, who died today at age 91, was one of the first. He moved from revivals in the 1940s that packed thousands into the tent to a radio and television ministry that reached millions. And he founded Oral Roberts University in Tulsa.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, host:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, host:

I'm Robert Siegel.

And we now mark the passing of a pioneering televangelist. Oral Roberts, who died today at age 91, was one of the first. He moved from revivals in the 1940s that packed thousands of people into the tent to a radio and television ministry that reached millions. And he founded Oral Roberts University in Tulsa.

KOSU, the state’s public radio, is the recipient of a first place award from Public Radio News Directors Incorporated, a non profit professional association that exists to improve local news and information programming by serving public radio journalists.

Oklahoma City Welcomes Shot at NBA Team

Apr 20, 2008

As basketball fans in Seattle try to find a way to keep the SuperSonics in their city, the Sooner State is gearing up to welcome the team to Oklahoma City.

Michael Cross reports for member station KOSU.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Scandal Plagues Oral Roberts University

Nov 23, 2007

Oral Roberts University is in trouble. The Tulsa, Okla., school founded by evangelist Oral Roberts is the target of several lawsuits. The Christian university also says it is more than $50 million in debt.

And there are allegations that the university's current president, Richard Roberts, and his family spent university money for personal use. Roberts is the son of Oral Roberts.

Scott Gurian reports from member station KGOU in Norman, Okla.

A Half-Century Underground in Tulsa

Jun 15, 2007

Fifty years ago, the citizens of Tulsa, Okla., buried a 1957 Plymouth Belvedere in a vault, in what has to be one of the most interesting time capsules ever.

Mid-century historian and car nut Charles Phoenix has been driving with NPR's Steve Proffitt from Los Angeles to Tulsa to see the '57 Plymouth, which is finally being unearthed this Friday.

But already, those anticipating the car's unveiling have received disturbing news: The vault leaked, and over the years, the Plymouth was submerged in water.

A Journey Back to the Future

Jun 11, 2007

Ride along with mid-century maniac Charles Phoenix and NPR senior producer Steve Proffitt in our series "Destination: Time Capsule," a classic road trip with a twist.

Charles' 1961 mint green metallic Pontiac Bonneville coupe provides trustworthy transportation for a high-octane adventure from Los Angeles to Tulsa, Okla.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

The City Parks Board in Tulsa, Oklahoma, votes tomorrow on a controversial exhibit proposed for the city zoo that would describe the origins of the universe in biblical terms. The board is reconsidering an earlier vote to mount the exhibit at the zoo. As NPR's Greg Allen reports, the clash between science and religion is dividing many in Tulsa.

GREG ALLEN reporting:

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KOSU's Michael Cross talks about political news in Oklahoma with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican political consultant Neva Hill.

Stream classical music via our partners at KUCO!

Education News

oksenate.gov

A Oklahoma Senate subcommittee passed seven bills about teacher pay on Wednesday, each one providing a different solution to the teacher pay problem.

Some of the bills propose $1,000 raises, others $10,000. Some provide funding mechanisms, while others do not.

Senator J.J. Dossett (D-Owasso) says this is just the beginning of the conversation. He says the legislature knows raising teacher pay is the right thing to do and they've just got to figure out the right way to do it.

With a nearly $900 million budget shortfall, Oklahoma lawmakers want accountability for every penny. But within the coffers of private charter school management companies are millions of dollars that lawmakers can't see. 

Senator Jason Smalley wants to know exactly how much schools are spending on administration. He filed a bill to find out, because right now he said it’s not clear.

“Are all the individuals that should be classified as administration costs, actually being reported as that?” he asked. “I think that’s what the greater conversation is.”

Emily Wendler / KOSU

There is a debate nationwide over the effectiveness of online education, and Oklahoma isn’t immune to it. Here, enrollment in virtual schools is booming, but the schools are performing poorly. There are also questions about the companies that run these schools and their financial practices.

Opponents to online education say the state should stop supporting virtual schools until there’s more information about them. But, others say they are vital to certain types of students. 

Throughout middle school, Toby Carter’s teachers struggled to keep him challenged.

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A weekly two-hour show of Oklahoma music, from across the state. The show opens a window of Oklahoma music to the rest of the world.