State Question Could Bring Wine And Cold Beer To More Places, Change Oklahoma’s Alcohol Distribution

“There he is!” Bryan Kerr said with a laugh, as he greeted a customer at his liquor store in Moore. ”You’re always showing up at exactly the right time.”The customer navigated through rows of bottles at Moore Liquor, while Kerr slipped outside. He took a few steps to an adjoining storefront to another business he owns: Party Moore.“A lot of people mistake it for like a Party Galaxy or Party City. It is not that,” Kerr said as he cracked open the store’s door. “It is a party store that is...
Read More

Law and order have been a major theme this year on the campaign trail. But that means very different things to the two major party presidential candidates.

With just under two months to go before the November election, we're taking a closer look at where Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump stand on issues of crime and policing.

Kelly Burley / KOSU

“When you’ve got nothin’, you’ve got nothin’ to lose.”
“Behind every beautiful thing, there’s some kind of pain.”
“Some people feel the rain. Others just get wet.”

His words and music are said to have changed American culture and he’s been described as the spokesman for a generation. And now, Bob Dylan’s collection of words, music and artistry is being permanently gathered and assembled in Tulsa – for the benefit of researchers and fans alike.

Headlines for Wednesday, September 21, 2016:

  • Tulsa Police say Crutcher was reaching into his car when he was fatally shot. (Tulsa World)

  • The oil and gas slump is impacting Oklahoma’s hotel industry. (Journal Record)

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Oklahoma’s Department of Public Safety is joining in the National Child Passenger Safety Week.

KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Lieutenant Joe Williams about this initiative pushed by the National Transportation Safety Administration designed to raise awareness of how to keep our kids secured in vehicles.

You can find more information on the web at SaferCar.gov.

Tulsa Police

The video is disturbing and prompts many questions — and that's how the police see it. The family of Terence Crutcher, who was shot dead by police Friday, says the footage should lead to criminal charges against the officer who killed an unarmed man.

The Justice Department has begun a parallel investigation into possible civil rights charges related to Crutcher's death, U.S. Attorney Danny Williams Sr. said Monday. He promised "to seek justice on behalf of this family, and for the public."

Headlines for Tuesday, September 20, 2016:

  • The US Justice Department opens its own investigation into the Tulsa Police shooting death of Terence Crutcher. (KWGS)

  • Oklahoma’s Attorney General is putting his support behind an effort to reform asset forfeiture. (NewsOK)

Though the rate of earthquakes “has declined from its peak,” the 5.8-magnitude earthquake near Pawnee has made 2016 the most seismically active year on record “as measured by seismic energy release,” Oklahoma Geological Survey Director Jeremy Boak tells the Enid News‘ Sally Asher.

Updated at 6:30 p.m. ET with charges

The suspect in the New York and New Jersey bombs has been charged with five counts of attempted murder of a law enforcement officer. Prosecutors in Union County, N.J., say Ahmad Khan Rahami has also been charged with two weapons crimes. His bail has been set at $5.2 million.

Our original post:

Headlines for Monday, September 19, 2016:

  • Religious leaders raise issues with Ten Commandments state Question. (NewsOK)

  • Opponents of Right to Farm state question gather to strategize. (Tulsa World)

Pages

Join us in our collaborative series with KGOU focusing on election issues in Oklahoma.

KOSU's Michael Cross talks about political news in Oklahoma with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican political consultant Neva Hill.

Education News

The hurdles Native American teenagers face in and out of school are daunting. College Horizons, a small organization based in New Mexico, has proven they're not insurmountable.

Every year, the group sponsors week-long retreats on college campuses for teenagers from some of the more than 500 federally-recognized tribes in the U.S.

One of those retreats was at Lawrence University in Appleton, Wis., where 85 students gathered along with dozens of admissions officers from some of the nation's most selective universities.

ok.gov/sde/superintendent

The Department of Education released statewide student assessment scores at Thursday’s State Board of Education meeting and the results show an overall upward trend of improvement. But a slight one. 

Overall, Oklahoma students are performing better at reading than they are in math. On average, 70 percent of third through eighth-grade students are proficient in reading, and 65 percent of students are scoring proficient in math.

The good news: There's an uptick in the hiring of new teachers since the pink-slip frenzy in the wake of the Great Recession.

The bad news: The new hiring hasn't made up for the teacher shortfall. Attrition is high, and enrollment in teacher preparation programs has fallen some 35 percent over the past five years — a decrease of nearly 240,000 teachers in all.

Parts of most every state in America face troubling teacher shortages: the most frequent shortage areas are math, science, bilingual education and special education.

More Education News