New Member Benefits: T-Shirt, Keep It Local Card & Brewery Tour

We're happy to offer three special benefits for KOSU members during the 2015 Fall Membership Drive (taking place between Wednesday, October 7 to Wednesday, October 14). Become a KOSU member today and get your member benefit!1. Pledges of $60 ($5/month) will be eligible for the 2016 Keep It Local OK card. The card is valid for great discounts across the state, including Oklahoma City, Tulsa, Edmond, Guthrie, Norman, Moore, Yukon and more! Keep It Local OK cards are valid for the current...
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Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

More than 500 Oklahoma employees of Chesapeake Energy are out of a job following the latest layoffs Sept. 29th, as oil prices stay below $50 a barrel. Gasoline is cheap, but that relief at the pump can fuel widespread worry about Oklahoma’s oil and gas-reliant economy.

Every month, NPR Music asks public radio personalities around this country to name a new favorite song and, this month, KOSU featured Oklahoma City band Tallows.

Tallows' aptly titled second album, Waist Deep, is full of water wordplay, with phrases like "drowning in excuses" and "wash it all clean" weaving through the lyrics. Continuing with that theme, the Oklahoma City band played its album-release show a few weeks ago in an empty swimming pool at a historic Presbyterian church. Local crowds are partial to Tallows, too, as the band's lush, frenetic sounds have been triggering rousing singalongs and dancing masses at its live shows. Pulling from influences like Modest Mouse, American Football and Pinback, Tallows' songs blur the space between math rock and electronic rock. But if you're not ready to make a decision on Tallows just yet, that's okay. Jump in halfway — the water's fine. —Ryan LaCroix, KOSU's The Spy

Emily Wendler / KOSU

Jarred Geller uses punk rock to teach his preschoolers about shapes and geography.

“If I play ‘Wheels on the Bus’ it’s hard for them to get invested in that,” he said.

But with catchy, poppy hooks, and fist-pumping riffs, the 5-year-olds are all in.

Geller started his "Punk Rock Preschool" at Eugene Field Elementary in Oklahoma City last January. He knew that fun and play were essential to young students, so he wrote some songs to incorporate rocking out into his lesson plans.

Headlines for Wednesday, September 30, 2015:

  • State gets ready to execute Richard Glossip. (Tulsa World)

  • The Oklahoma City Council makes changes to its anti-panhandling bill. (Journal Record)

  • The deadline to move the Ten Commandments statue is approaching. (Norman Transcript)

The Oklahoma City Council advances an ordinance to ban everyone from medians not just panhandlers.

The council heard from several citizens opposed to the measure like Derrek Jump, a veteran who advocates for homeless vets. Jump says he’s opposed to the idea of fining and jailing our poorest citizens.

"I think what it boils down to is extra revenue for our great city and the fact that we're willing to create revenue off the backs of our homeless population is absolutely reprehensible," says Jump.


A group of state energy officials, researchers and industry experts issued a report Monday offering guidance on how to handle earthquakes triggered by oil and gas activity.

This Land Press

When you think of Bluegrass music, you probably don’t think of Japan.

But, an article coming up in the fall issue of This Land Press focuses on the phenomenon of Japanese people playing and enjoying the Americana-style of music.

KOSU’s Michael Cross got a chance to talk to the author, Denis Gainty about the history of the genre and the nature of bluegrass music.

Denis Gainty teaches history as Associate Professor at Georgia State University.

Headlines for Tuesday, September 29, 2015:

  • Attorneys for a man set to be executed tomorrow night plan to keep fighting. (KFOR)

  • Army Officials ask Congressman Steve Russell for more time on female Ranger records request. (Ledger-Enquirer

  • State budget leaders tell agency heads to prepare for the worst. (Tulsa World)

Two Republican presidential hopefuls will be making short stops in Oklahoma on Tuesday.

Former Florida governor Jeb Bush is planning to attend a private fundraiser in Oklahoma City on Tuesday morning. The breakfast reception is closed to the public and the press, and an online invitation to the event encourages a $2,700 donation level for supporters.

Following the Oklahoma City event, Bush is expected to head to Pittsburgh to lay out details of his energy plan.

Oklahoma Department of Corrections

An Oklahoma appeals court has narrowly denied a death row inmate's last-minute request for a new hearing and ordered that his execution may proceed.

In a 3-2 decision on Monday, the Oklahoma Court of Criminal Appeals denied Richard Glossip's request for an evidentiary hearing and an emergency stay of execution. The court ruled the state can proceed with Glossip's execution, which is scheduled for Wednesday.