Zane LaCroix

More Than 53,000 Remain Without Power in Oklahoma

More than 53,000 homes and businesses remain without electricity after an ice storm hit Oklahoma. Oklahoma Gas & Electric Co. says more than 24,000 of those outages are in Oklahoma City. Enid and El Reno also reported more than 4,000 outages each. The utility says it had 150,000 customers without power because of the wintry storm system that brought freezing rain, sleet and heavy rainfall to the state, but service has been restored to about 90,000. Gov. Mary Fallin issued a disaster...
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Mumford & Sons Ticket Giveaway

See them on April 6, 2016 at BOK Center in Tulsa

Over the weekend, I watched as crowds in the hundreds gathered in Paris' 10th arrondissement at the killing sites: a few neighborhood bistros like Le Carillon, and a Cambodian restaurant, Le Petit Cambodge — Little Cambodia.

The crowds moved quietly, like museumgoers, as they observed the memorial bouquets and candles or added to them with a hushed reverence.

There are bullet holes in the windows and walls, and the scenes of disorder inside were evidence of the chaos Friday night: beer glasses, still full, on the bar. A single shoe on the floor. Shards of glass.

University of Oklahoma President David Boren wrote an op-ed for TIME Magazine regarding OU's experience with a viral racist video this spring. Boren writes about what he learned and how the campus reacted.

Denise Cross / Flickr

Registered independents in Oklahoma will be able to vote in Democratic primaries beginning in 2016, including the presidential preferential primary on March 1.

Oklahoma Democratic Party Chairman Mark Hammons formally notified the state Election Board secretary on Monday that independents will be allowed to vote in any party primary election or runoff primary held over the next two years.

The change was formally approved at the Democratic Party's state convention in July. Hammons says he believes the change will help Democratic candidates appeal to more voters.

Headlines for Monday, November 16, 2015:

  • The Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum is holding a prayer vigil for Paris. (Fox25)

  • Troopers issue 56 citations for violating the two-week-old texting and driving ban. (Tulsa World)

  • Guthrie public schools are looking at arming teachers. (News9)

Hillary Clinton entered the second debate of the campaign for the Democratic presidential nomination with far less to prove than she had in the first, and, in the end, she probably achieved far less as well.

But for the time being, at least, she may be able to afford it.

Updated 4:25 a.m. ET Monday:

French Prime Minister Manuel Valls tells French radio RTL that there have been more than 150 raids throughout the night in France. More are expected.

Sunday's post:

As France observed its first of three days of national mourning, police said they were looking for a suspect who they believe may have been involved in the coordinated attacks that left scores dead in Paris on Friday.

At first glance, the Boy Scout chapter at the Oklahomans for Equality community center in Tulsa, Okla., could be any other. Three boys hold an American flag as they lead a group in the Boy Scout Oath. These words are the same every Cub Scout pack uses to start a meeting. And the room, too — with its fluorescent lights and vinyl floor tiles — looks like any church parlor.

The death toll in a coordinated and ruthless attack on six different targets in and around Paris has risen to 129, with 352 people injured, according to Paris prosecutor Francois Molins. He added that 99 people were critically wounded.

Speaking nearly 24 hours after the start of Friday night's attacks, Molins outlined the sequence of the attacks, and said investigators had traced records related to one of the vehicles they used to Belgium, where three arrests were made.

Since emerging as a powerful force two years ago, the Islamic State had focused its energies on building its self-proclaimed caliphate in the Middle East. The carnage in Paris, for which the group has claimed responsibility, demonstrated it can unleash a ferocious, coordinated assault far from its home turf.

Friday's attacks in Paris that killed more than 100 people could weigh heavily on tonight's Democratic debate, with White House hopefuls pressed anew on how they would combat terrorism and a growing threat from ISIS. The debate's initial focus will be on the attacks, as to be expected, according to a source with knowledge of debate preparations.


Education News

Emily Wendler / KOSU

A large crowd showed up for the Oklahoma City Public School Board meeting Monday night to comment on the district's new discipline policy.  A majority of the commenters were concerned that the new policy is not doing enough to address student misbehavior. A few comments were positive, and showed support for the Board of Education’s efforts. Here’s a sampling:

After a long stalemate, a bipartisan team of congressional negotiators has agreed to overhaul the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. The law, currently known as No Child Left Behind, sends roughly $14 billion a year to schools that serve mostly low-income students.

Here's what we know about the rough agreement. First, annual testing — a major feature of NCLB — would remain for grades three through eight and at least once in high school. Schools would still have to test 95 percent of their students and report the results by race, income and special need.

Protests at the University of Missouri and other college campuses are forcing universities into uncomfortable discussions about race and diversity. One school got a head start.

Earlier this year, the University of Oklahoma came under intense pressure when a video showed two members of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity singing a racist chant.

Now, students are comparing the reaction of their university with the recent controversies at Mizzou.

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KOSU Program

A weekly two-hour show of Oklahoma music, from across the state. The show opens a window of Oklahoma music to the rest of the world.

Political News

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill about the attacks in Paris and calls by leaders, mostly Republicans who called on the President to stop allowing Syrian refugees into the country as well as opposition from a group including former Attorney General Drew Edmondson on the Right to Farm state question going before voters next November.

This post was updated at 6:30 p.m.

Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal suspended his campaign for the Republican nomination for president on Tuesday, saying he had "come to the realization that this is not my time."

The son of Indian immigrants, Jindal said that when his parents came to the United States 45 years ago, they told him he could accomplish anything in this country. But ultimately this time, his dreams of the White House fell short.

Updated at 5:45 p.m. ET

One of the suicide bombers who struck Paris on Friday has been identified as a Syrian who passed through Greece as an asylum-seeker this year and registered with European authorities.

That fact has spurred a strong reaction from many politicians here in the United States over the resettlement of Syrian refugees, with swift opposition from many Republican governors, and one Democrat, to further resettlement of Syrian refugees in their states.

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