John Durkee / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

Prosecutors File Manslaughter Charges Against Tulsa Officer Who Shot, Killed Terence Crutcher

Prosecutors filed felony charges Thursday against a Tulsa police officer involved in the shooting death of an unarmed black man. The charges come less than a week after Terence Crutcher was shot Friday. “I’ve determined that the filing of the felony crime of manslaughter in the first degree against Tulsa Police Officer Betty Shelby is warranted,” Tulsa County District Attorney Steve Kunzweiler said during a press conference. “Officer Shelby, although now charged, is presumed to be innocent...
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Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Heavy Fundraising on State Question 777 Suggests Right-to-Farm is High-Stakes Political Issue

Oklahoma voters will decide in November whether to change the state constitution with new language protecting the agriculture industry. Informally known as the right-to-farm amendment, State Question 777 raises a lot of legal, environmental and economic questions. A StateImpact analysis of state campaign finance data shows the issue has attracted more direct donations than any other ballot question, suggesting right-to-farm is high-stakes Oklahoma politics. CASH CROP Individuals, businesses...
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Updated at 6:30 p.m. ET with charges

The suspect in the New York and New Jersey bombs has been charged with five counts of attempted murder of a law enforcement officer. Prosecutors in Union County, N.J., say Ahmad Khan Rahami has also been charged with two weapons crimes. His bail has been set at $5.2 million.

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Headlines for Monday, September 19, 2016:

  • Religious leaders raise issues with Ten Commandments state Question. (NewsOK)

  • Opponents of Right to Farm state question gather to strategize. (Tulsa World)

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump spent a little over an hour in Norman Saturday afternoon, courting campaign donors just a few blocks from the campus of the University of Oklahoma.

More than 100 demonstrators gathered near the private residence where the fundraiser was held, protesting Trump’s views on race, immigration, and the economy.

The oddest of Senate odd couples — California Democrat Barbara Boxer and Oklahoma Republican Jim Inhofe — have accomplished something highly unusual in this bitter election year: significant, bipartisan legislation on the environment that has become law.

Boxer, a staunch liberal, calls climate change the "greatest challenge to hit the planet," battles against offshore drilling, rails about the dangers of nuclear power and has pushed to restrict greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to global warming.

facebook.com/thinktwiceok

A proposal to ask Oklahoma voters to enshrine the death penalty in the state's nearly 100-year-old constitution sailed easily through the Legislature, but now is facing opposition from groups on opposite ends of the political spectrum.

In addition to various faith and civil rights organizations that traditionally oppose capital punishment, several conservative groups and the newly recognized Oklahoma Libertarian Party also are joining the fight against State Question 776.

Despite facing some of the nation's strictest anti-abortion laws, a Kansas-based foundation opened a new facility in Oklahoma City - the first new abortion provider in the state in 40 years.

The Trust Women South Wind Women's Center welcomed the first patients last week to its clinic on the city's south side. Six licensed physicians are providing services there, including abortions, OB-GYN care, family planning, adoption and emergency contraception.

Justin Blackmon was one of the most gifted wide receivers in college football history. Then, after bouts with alcohol and the law, he disappeared from view. The Ringer visits his hometown of Ardmore to figure out where it all went wrong.

Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

The section of the Arkansas River that runs through Tulsa is changing. For much of the city’s history, business owners constructed buildings facing away from what has been considered a polluted eyesore. But now Tulsa is embracing its most prominent physical feature.

This is Sample Size, our weekly new music feature with KOSU's Ryan LaCroix and LOOKatOKC music critic Matt Carney.

Today, Matt plays new music from D.R.A.M., Tancred, and Lower Dens.

Headlines for Friday, September 16, 2016:

  • Prosecutors in the OSU Homecoming parade crash submit a list of 200 witnesses. (Tulsa World)

  • A debate for Oklahoma County Sheriff turns combative. (NewsOK)

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KOSU's Michael Cross talks about political news in Oklahoma with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican political consultant Neva Hill.

Weeknights with Ferris

Hear Ferris O'Brien every weeknight, from 9 p.m. to midnight, on The Spy.

Education News

The hurdles Native American teenagers face in and out of school are daunting. College Horizons, a small organization based in New Mexico, has proven they're not insurmountable.

Every year, the group sponsors week-long retreats on college campuses for teenagers from some of the more than 500 federally-recognized tribes in the U.S.

One of those retreats was at Lawrence University in Appleton, Wis., where 85 students gathered along with dozens of admissions officers from some of the nation's most selective universities.

ok.gov/sde/superintendent

The Department of Education released statewide student assessment scores at Thursday’s State Board of Education meeting and the results show an overall upward trend of improvement. But a slight one. 

Overall, Oklahoma students are performing better at reading than they are in math. On average, 70 percent of third through eighth-grade students are proficient in reading, and 65 percent of students are scoring proficient in math.

The good news: There's an uptick in the hiring of new teachers since the pink-slip frenzy in the wake of the Great Recession.

The bad news: The new hiring hasn't made up for the teacher shortfall. Attrition is high, and enrollment in teacher preparation programs has fallen some 35 percent over the past five years — a decrease of nearly 240,000 teachers in all.

Parts of most every state in America face troubling teacher shortages: the most frequent shortage areas are math, science, bilingual education and special education.

More Education News
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