The Two-Way
8:18 am
Sat July 25, 2015

Pentagon Asks 'Armed Citizens' Not To Stand Guard At Recruiting Centers

Zachary Gallegos, 23, stands guard outside the Armed Services Recruiting Center on Thursday in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. The Pentagon has asked such self-appointed "armed citizens" to leave, citing security concerns.
Kevin Burbach AP

Originally published on Sat July 25, 2015 1:12 pm

Updated at 1:10 p.m. ET

The Defense Department, reacting to armed citizens appearing in front of military recruiting offices around the country since last week's fatal shootings of five U.S. servicemen in Chattanooga, Tenn., has asked that "individuals not stand guard" on federal property.

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US News
7:48 am
Sat July 25, 2015

A Navajo Speaker Says The Language Connects Her With Her Culture

Supporters of Navajo presidential candidate Chris Deschene were unhappy last October when a court determined that he did not meet the language requirement.
Felicia Fonseca AP

Originally published on Sat July 25, 2015 10:55 am

Should the president of the Navajo Nation be required to speak fluent Navajo?

The Navajo Nation held a referendum on that question this week, and the majority voted no.

The vote was victory for supporters of a Navajo presidential candidate who was disqualified last fall because he didn't speak the language fluently. The next Navajo Nation election is in 2018.

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3:45 pm
Fri July 24, 2015

NY Times Profiles Oklahoma City's R&J Lounge and Supper Club

The New York Times entered the tiny Oklahoma City spot to find fried catfish, tiki drinks, and a great music selection.
When I tugged open the door to R&J Lounge and Supper Club, a midcentury-inspired restaurant, I expected plumes of cigarette smoke to waft into the air.
Arts Education
1:13 pm
Fri July 24, 2015

Pilot Program Gives Inner City Girls Exposure to the Arts

Magdalena Escobedo, 10, shows off her painting at the Oklahoma City Girl's Art School.
Emily Wendler KOSU

In the midst of budget cuts for education, and extracurriculars being shoved aside, some people in Oklahoma are going to great lengths to ensure exposure to the arts doesn’t disappear for students. 

In the back of an art studio in Oklahoma City, 10-year-old Magdalena Escobedo is painting a picture of a place she'd like to take her Mom one day.

"I’ve got a pond, well it's more like a lake. And then I have a campfire with rocks around it right here and then I have a tent," she said. "And I have a lot of evergreen trees."

She's participating in a free, two week pilot program that brings art classes to young girls in the inner city. Escobedo says she's learned about tinting and shading, watercolors,  and adding texture to her art.  

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Headlines
8:48 am
Fri July 24, 2015

Headlines: Broken Arrow Murders, Weekend Heat & 2015 Oklahoma Music

Headlines for Friday, July 24, 2015:

  • The Tulsa suburb of Broken Arrow is reeling after what is being called an unprecedented family tragedy. (Tulsa World)

  • Oklahoma City is looking into its options on the American Indian Cultural Center. (NewsOK)

  • Architectural plans for OKC MAPS3 park are coming soon. (NewsOK)

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Arts & Culture
7:00 am
Fri July 24, 2015

Kids Get Crash Course in Comic Books

The Sterling Gates Fan Page on Facebook

This weekend, DC Comics writer Sterling Gates will host a comics writing seminar for kids at three libraries in Oklahoma City.

KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Gates about his interest in comics and what kind of advice he gives to aspiring writers.

The first two workshops are taking place Friday afternoon at 1 p.m. at Southern Oaks Library and at 4 p.m. at Capitol Hill Library, and Saturday morning at 10 a.m. at the Edmond Library. You can find out more information at MetroLibraries.org.

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Health
6:14 pm
Thu July 23, 2015

Why Disability And Poverty Still Go Hand In Hand 25 Years After Landmark Law

After a long day, Emeka arrives home to the apartment in South Tulsa that he shares with his father.
Kenneth M. Ruggiano for NPR

Originally published on Sun July 26, 2015 10:28 am

If you have a disability in the U.S., you're twice as likely to be poor as someone without a disability. You're also far more likely to be unemployed. And that gap has widened in the 25 years since the landmark Americans with Disabilities Act was enacted.

"Every man, woman and child with a disability can now pass through once-closed doors into a bright new era of equality, independence and freedom," President George H.W. Bush said when he signed the bill into law on July 26, 1990.

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The Two-Way
4:56 pm
Thu July 23, 2015

Army Warns Of 'Armed Citizens' Trying To Protect Recruiting Stations

Members of the FBI Evidence Response Team investigate the shooting at the Armed Forces Career Center/National Guard Recruitment Office on July 17 in Chattanooga, Tenn. Since the shooting, armed civilians have begun trying to guard such centers.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 23, 2015 6:51 pm

The Army is not happy about armed civilians who have been appearing at recruiting stations in several states in the wake of the Chattanooga shootings, ostensibly to help guard against such attacks.

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Here & Now
4:10 pm
Thu July 23, 2015

Tulsa Braces For 100-Degree Weekend

Liz Moody, left, and Stephanie Russell, right, both of Forest Grove, Oregon, cover their heads with towls to keep cool as they watch a World Cup of Softball game in Oklahoma City on July 21, 2011. (Sue Ogrocki/AP)

NOAA’s National Climate Data Center reported this week that temperatures across the globe for the first six months of 2015 are the warmest on record.

While that is great for beachgoers, it also endangers millions of lives, as heat is the No. 1 weather-related killer in the United States.

One city that’s feeling the heat is Tulsa, Oklahoma, which has 100-degree temperatures forecast for the weekend.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
1:48 pm
Thu July 23, 2015

Oklahoma’s Economically Vital Seaport Still Struggling After Rains Scuttle Shipping

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' Tulsa office snapped this photo of the Webbers Falls Lock and Dam in late May 2015.
USACETULSA / Flickr

Two and a half million tons of wheat, fertilizer, steel, and manufacturing goods pass through the Port of Catoosa each year.

But not in 2015. The nation’s most inland seaport, located near Tulsa, shut down after historic spring rains and is still struggling to rebound.

From the Port of Catoosa, barges makes their way down the Verdigris River, to the Arkansas River and east to the Mississippi along the McClellan-Kerr Navigation system, Oklahoma’s water link to the Gulf of Mexico and river towns to the east like Pittsburg and Chicago. The waterway was the most expensive civil works project the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers had ever built when it opened in 1971, and it was pushed by powerful Senator Robert S. Kerr, of Oklahoma.

“There’s over a billion and a half dollars of private investment, just at this port,” says David Yarbrough, the port’s deputy director. “8,000 maritime jobs in Oklahoma.”

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