Support KOSU & Help Feed Hungry Oklahoma Children

We're happy to offer a special way for you to financially support KOSU and help feed hungry children in Oklahoma during the 2017 Fall Membership Drive (taking place between Wednesday, September 13 to Wednesday, September 20). Make your pledge now! For every pledge made during KOSU's on-air fundraiser, Phillips Murrah P.C. will support the cost of a weekend backpack full of nutritious food for an Oklahoma child in need, to be packed and distributed by the Regional Food Bank of Oklahoma and the...

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Allison Herrera / KOSU

Let Down And Locked Up: Why Oklahoma's Female Incarceration Is So High

Robyn Allen saw her daughter for the first time in two years from across the yard of Oklahoma’s largest women’s prison, the Mabel Bassett Correctional Center. Because the two were serving time for the same 2013 methamphetamine case, they weren’t supposed to communicate. But as Allen’s daughter, Cherise Greer, was being loaded into a van on her way to another prison this summer, the guard turned away. Greer, in an orange prison uniform, called out: “I love you.” “She told me she loved me and...

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President Trump's pick for the next leader of NASA is a fighter pilot who wants Americans to return to the moon but doesn't believe that humans are causing climate change.

District leaders in the Oklahoma City Public Schools will soon head out into the community to ask this question: Should the four elementary schools they believe are the namesake of Confederate generals be renamed?

The origin of that question goes back several weeks. Right after the violence broke out in Charlottesville, Va., Charles Henry, a school board member in Oklahoma City, voiced his concern about the name of Jackson Elementary, which he says had been bothering him for a while.

The blast was picked up by seismic stations all over the world, and it was big.

Updated at 4:00 p.m. ET Sunday:

North Korea claims it has again tested a hydrogen bomb underground and that it "successfully" loaded it onto the tip of an intercontinental ballistic missile, a claim that if true, crosses a "red line" drawn by South Korea's president last month.

In a state media announcement, North Korea confirmed the afternoon tremors in its northeast were indeed caused by the test of a nuclear device, and that leader Kim Jong Un personally signed off on the test.

Headlines for Friday, September 1, 2017:

  • Oklahoma breaks a record in its prison population. (NewsOK)

  • Broken Arrow Republican calls education cuts “fake news”. (NewsOK)

I
Allison Herrera/PRI 

Marilyn Vann always knew her background and where her family came from. She knew she was a Cherokee Freedman, a descendant of former slaves, and that she deserved to have full tribal citizenship, just like other native Cherokees.

That's why she was surprised to get a rejection letter when she tried to enroll more than a decade ago. After all, her father was an original enrollee on the Dawes Roll, a historical US government record of tribal members. That meant, she said, she was eligible for citizenship into the tribe.

A judge ruled Wednesday that the descendants of enslaved people who were owned by members of the Cherokee Nation — known as Cherokee Freedmen — have citizenship rights.

"The Cherokee Nation can continue to define itself as it sees fit," U.S. District Judge Thomas F. Hogan wrote in his ruling, "but must do so equally and evenhandedly with respect to native Cherokees and the descendants of Cherokee Freedmen."

Copyright 2017 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

The State Supreme Court declares lawmakers have the constitutional right to remove an exemption to sales tax on motor vehicles.

Yesterday’s 5-4 decision on a 1.25% tax increase for car sales keeps about 100 million dollars in the budget.

KOSU's Michael Cross sat down with the Governor at the State Capitol to get her reaction to the ruling, the possibility of a special session and thoughts on Oklahoma's aid to Tropical Storm Harvey victims.

Headlines for Thursday, August 31, 2017:

  • Members of the Cherokee Freedmen win their citizenship. (KOSU)

  • Oklahoma emergency responders are staying busy in south Texas. (Tulsa World)

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KOSU's Michael Cross talks about political news in Oklahoma with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican political consultant Neva Hill.

Education News

The superintendent of Oklahoma City Public Schools said Tuesday that the Trump administration’s decision to end the DACA program will be “devastating” to students and staff in the majority Hispanic district.

For three weeks, local historians have been working to figure out who two Oklahoma City Public Schools are named after. Now, they think they’ve figured it out.

The mystery arose when Oklahoma City Public School officials announced they were thinking about changing the names of four schools thought to be named for Confederate generals. This worried local historians who said that two of those schools may actually named after former city leaders.

District leaders in the Oklahoma City Public Schools will soon head out into the community to ask this question: Should the four elementary schools they believe are the namesake of Confederate generals be renamed?

The origin of that question goes back several weeks. Right after the violence broke out in Charlottesville, Va., Charles Henry, a school board member in Oklahoma City, voiced his concern about the name of Jackson Elementary, which he says had been bothering him for a while.

More Education News